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JM

Puritan Board Doctor
I get mine for free from my service provider perhaps your provider will offer something similar? My computer is locked down.
 
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Semper Fidelis

2 Timothy 2:24-25
Staff member
Let me just point out something. This is not to toot my decision over the AVG Free Advisor issue

- BUT -

In this day and age, virus protection is probably less important than spyware, firewall, and script protection. Not everything that can attack your computer, or even make it a zombie for a DDOS attack, comes in the form of a virus.The Free Avast Home Edition is a much more comprehensive protection.
 

Greg

Puritan Board Sophomore
AVG has been on my computer for the last couple of months. It is VERY good, updates daily/nearly daily (automatically), and it is FREE!!!

AVG Free Advisor - Free antivirus and anti-spyware downloads
:up::ditto::up:
:up::up::ditto::up::up:

I've been running this program for the past 2-3 years with no infections or problems caused by the program itself.

In this day and age, virus protection is probably less important than spyware, firewall, and script protection. Not everything that can attack your computer, or even make it a zombie for a DDOS attack, comes in the form of a virus.The Free Avast Home Edition is a much more comprehensive protection.
Good point. I'm not personally familiar with Avast (I've only heard good things about it though), but I have been using the free antispyware program also by AVG for the past few months. So far it's been doing a good job. For a firewall, I've been using Sygate's free personal firewall for quite some time now.
 

Southern Presbyterian

Puritan Board Doctor

Semper Fidelis

2 Timothy 2:24-25
Staff member
BTW, one thing I really like about Avast as well is how memory efficient it is. Norton, Trend Micro, and MacAfee are all memory hogs.
 

fredtgreco

Vanilla Westminsterian
Staff member
It's not free, but I have been using NoD32 for some time now. The memory and resource footprint is minuscule compared to Norton and MacAfee. It is consistently rated among the best in AV tests. Version 2.7 is available now, but they are working on 3.0 (it is a RC that I am beta-testing now). They are also about to offer a Security Suite (who doesn't nowadays?) that is in beta test. It has a similar tiny footprint, and gives excellent AV, very good firewall, and decent anti-spam (I have yet to find an anti-spam I really like).

You can check it out at:
Antivirus Software - Eliminate Spyware and Adware with NOD32 Antivirus from ESET
 

fredtgreco

Vanilla Westminsterian
Staff member
BY the way, I just noticed, that is you type in a regular url, the PB now pulls down the name of the url automatically and inserts it. Neat!
 

BobVigneault

Bawberator
They don't! But as it says in the Bible, "an ounce of prevention is worth a pound of cure".

(Remember, I'm from rural Vermont, our Bibles are a little different than the rest. You probably don't have "God helps those who help themselves" either.)
 

PuritanCovenanter

Moderator
Staff member
Can Avast be on at the same time McAfee is on? Just wondering. I have McAfee. And did you say it had anti-spyware on it Rich?
 

fredtgreco

Vanilla Westminsterian
Staff member
Can Avast be on at the same time McAfee is on? Just wondering. I have McAfee. And did you say it had anti-spyware on it Rich?
Randy,

It is a rally bad idea to run more than one AV at the same time. If you have already paid for MacAfee, I would use that until it runs out.
 

DMcFadden

Puritanboard Commissioner
Let me just point out something. This is not to toot my decision over the AVG Free Advisor issue

- BUT -

In this day and age, virus protection is probably less important than spyware, firewall, and script protection. Not everything that can attack your computer, or even make it a zombie for a DDOS attack, comes in the form of a virus.The Free Avast Home Edition is a much more comprehensive protection.
Thanks for the tip. I just switched to AVAST based on your recommendation! :cheers:
 

Southern Presbyterian

Puritan Board Doctor
Some related questions....

I read in a security update this weekend that it is best to run your anti-virus and anti-malware software when your computer is in SAFE MODE (to do an active scan that is). Supposedly it is easier for them to do their job in an environment were all drivers and dlls are not loaded.

1. Do any of you do this?

2. Would it be truly advantageous as the article suggests?

3.Wouldn't this also limit the AV or AM softwares access to all content on your PC?
 

Greg

Puritan Board Sophomore
They don't! But as it says in the Bible, "an ounce of prevention is worth a pound of cure".

(Remember, I'm from rural Vermont, our Bibles are a little different than the rest. You probably don't have "God helps those who help themselves" either.)
:lol: Those verses come right before the one that says, "Money is the root of all evil".
 

Semper Fidelis

2 Timothy 2:24-25
Staff member
I read in a security update this weekend that it is best to run your anti-virus and anti-malware software when your computer is in SAFE MODE (to do an active scan that is). Supposedly it is easier for them to do their job in an environment were all drivers and dlls are not loaded.

1. Do any of you do this?

2. Would it be truly advantageous as the article suggests?

3.Wouldn't this also limit the AV or AM softwares access to all content on your PC?
I don't typically do this but it's probably not a bad idea when checking a system for the very first time.
 

Calvibaptist

Dallas Cowboys' #1 Fan
I read in a security update this weekend that it is best to run your anti-virus and anti-malware software when your computer is in SAFE MODE (to do an active scan that is). Supposedly it is easier for them to do their job in an environment were all drivers and dlls are not loaded.

1. Do any of you do this?

2. Would it be truly advantageous as the article suggests?

3.Wouldn't this also limit the AV or AM softwares access to all content on your PC?
Avast can do a boot time scan which means that it runs the scan when the computer boots up before it even loads windows. This way it will catch anything that might be either hidden in windows or set to run at startup (and therefore wouldn't be able to be deleted by a regular scan).

BTW, I have used both Avast and AVG. I like both of them. I am switching back to Avast because it is more comprehensive in its coverage.

That and Avast is biblical just like believer's baptism...
 

Southern Presbyterian

Puritan Board Doctor
Avast can do a boot time scan which means that it runs the scan when the computer boots up before it even loads windows. This way it will catch anything that might be either hidden in windows or set to run at startup (and therefore wouldn't be able to be deleted by a regular scan).
Where is this option found? Do I have to select it before shutting down my computer?

That and Avast is biblical just like believer's baptism...
Of coarse, self-defense is bibliacal, and all believers should be baptised - along with thier covenant children. ;)
 

Calvibaptist

Dallas Cowboys' #1 Fan
Avast can do a boot time scan which means that it runs the scan when the computer boots up before it even loads windows. This way it will catch anything that might be either hidden in windows or set to run at startup (and therefore wouldn't be able to be deleted by a regular scan).
Where is this option found? Do I have to select it before shutting down my computer?
When Avast is first installed it asks you if you want it to run a boot-time scan. Another way to get to it is through the program itself. On the main user interface (looks like a car radio) there is an arrow on the upper left-hand corner. Click on this and a menu pops up. One of the choices is "Schedule a Boot-Time Scan." Click this and the next time you restart your computer it will scan everything before going into windows.

NOTE - Plan a lot of time for this process. It will take about an hour or two depending on the amount of stuff you have on your hard drive.
 
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