Ambrose of Milan: Did he labor for the Truth of the Bible in the manner of Augustine?

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Tim

Puritan Board Graduate
In his book, How Should we Then Live, Francis Schaeffer mentions two heroes of the early church: Ambrose and Augustine. Schaeffer states that they both “emphasized a true biblical Christianity”.

I don’t know much about Ambrose. Is he worth reading in the way that Augustine is?
 
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Presbyterian Deacon

Puritan Board Graduate
In his book, How Should we Then Live, Francis Schaeffer mentions two heroes of the early church: Ambrose and Augustine. Schaeffer states that they both “emphasized a true biblical Christianity”.

I don’t know much about Ambrose. Is he worth reading in the way that Augustine is?


Augustine himself speaks rather highly of Ambrose in several places throughout his Confessions.
 

DTK

Puritan Board Junior
In his book, I don’t know much about Ambrose. Is he worth reading in the way that Augustine is?

Augustine was converted under Ambrose's ministry, though from the human perspective God employed a number of people who were instruments of his conversion, not the least of which was his mother, Monica.

But your question concerning Ambrose is pretty much a broad one, because often the worth of one's writings tend to vary from reader to reader. I've appreciated Ambrose's writings very much for the simple reason that his views often contradict modern day Romanists.

Blessings,
DTK
 

VirginiaHuguenot

Puritanboard Librarian
At the risk of displaying my intellectual crockery -- in the words of Charles Spurgeon, who said:

You meet with no ostentation of learning in Matthew Poole, and that for the simple reason that he was so profoundly learned as to be able to give results without a display of his intellectual crockery. A pedant who is for ever quoting Ambrose and Jerome, Piscator and Œcolampadius, in order to show what a copious reader he has been, is usually a dealer in small wares, and quotes only what others have quoted before him, but he who can give you the result and outcome of very extensive reading without sounding a trumpet before him is the really learned man.

I like this quote from Ambrose:

http://www.puritanboard.com/f35/ambrose-psalm-singing-family-worship-37202/
 

Notthemama1984

Puritan Board Post-Graduate
At the risk of displaying my intellectual crockery -- in the words of Charles Spurgeon, who said:

You meet with no ostentation of learning in Matthew Poole, and that for the simple reason that he was so profoundly learned as to be able to give results without a display of his intellectual crockery. A pedant who is for ever quoting Ambrose and Jerome, Piscator and Œcolampadius, in order to show what a copious reader he has been, is usually a dealer in small wares, and quotes only what others have quoted before him, but he who can give you the result and outcome of very extensive reading without sounding a trumpet before him is the really learned man.

I like this quote from Ambrose:

http://www.puritanboard.com/f35/ambrose-psalm-singing-family-worship-37202/

:lol::lol::lol:
 
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