Ambrosiaster on the antiquity of ruling elders

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... Old age is honoured in every society, which is why the synagogue, and later on the church, had elders, without whose advice nothing was done in the church. I do not know why the custom has faded out. Perhaps it is because of the laziness of the teachers, or more likely because of their pride, since they want to be seen as the only ones who do anything. ...

For the reference, see Ambrosiaster on the antiquity of ruling elders.
 

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Been using Bray to fill in on translations for all the Latin citations in Jus Divinum Regiminis Ecclesiastici. The authors (individuals of the London Provincial Assembly, 1646, significant revision 1647-54), refer it to Ambrose. Here is my note (JDRE gives a translation in text with the Latin).
"Erasmus first cast doubt on the attribution of Commentaria in XIII Epistolas Beati Pauli to Ambrose, which it is said would have required him to have written it before he became a bishop. The work has since been attributed to the unknown individual Ambrosiaster (“would-be-Ambrose”), but is nevertheless considered an important work from the period. Cf. In Epistolam B. Pauli ad Timotheum Primam, PL 17, cols. 475–476. See also a translation in Bray, p. 133."
... Old age is honoured in every society, which is why the synagogue, and later on the church, had elders, without whose advice nothing was done in the church. I do not know why the custom has faded out. Perhaps it is because of the laziness of the teachers, or more likely because of their pride, since they want to be seen as the only ones who do anything. ...
For the reference, see Ambrosiaster on the antiquity of ruling elders.
N.B. This quotation is often mistakenly attributed to Ambrose of Milan.
 
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