America and the Imperial System of Measurement

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I'm a machinist by trade. I convert everything to inches for the purpose of programming/ dimensioning.

But the one thing I like about the metric system, is that you rarely see fractional measurements. Everything is in decimal form.
 
I’ll admit it. I like the imperial system.
It’s much easier for building. You can divide by 2, 3, 4, etc in your head. Metric you’ll end up with some weird decimal and need to bust out a calculator.

Same reason there are 360 degrees in a circle and not 100.
 
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It’s much easier for building. You can divide by 2, 3, 4, etc in your head. Metric you’ll end up with some weird decimal and need to bust out a calculator.

Same reason there at 360 degrees in a circle and not 100.
Interesting. I like science and engineering and get why scientists and engineers much prefer metric. During normal conversation the metric terms sound so antiseptic, less organic. I am just a granola head at heart. Even though “stone” is hardly heard in US English, it beats “kilo” or “kilogram” for the communications between living beings.
 
By the way, if anyone uses Linux, there is an incredible shell program called "units" that will convert pretty much anything (database of about 3,700 units):

VirtualBoxVM_qi9FYQVDJ8.png
 
Isn't 1000 pounds a short ton and 2000 pounds a ton or a long ton?

Also it appears to me that the UK uses a lot of non-metric units too commonly, like miles and stones.
 
This is what Washington was really trying to free America from:
  • 1 mite = 1/8 penny
  • 1 farthing = 1/4 penny
  • 2 farthings = 1 halfpenny
  • 2 halfpence = 1 penny (or a ‘copper')
  • 2 pence = 1 tuppence or a half-groat
  • 3 pence = 1 thruppence
  • 4 pence = 1 groat
  • 6 pence = 1 sixpence (a ‘tanner')
  • 12 pence = 1 shilling (a bob)
  • 2 shillings = 1 florin ( a ‘two bob bit')
  • 2 shillings and 6 pence = 1 half crown
  • 5 shillings = 1 Crown
  • 20 shillings = 1 pound
 
And how many US, imperial-teaching schools have educated US soldiers who are now defending all them green countries and spending a proportionately higher GDP to pay for it?
 
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This is what Washington was really trying to free America from:
  • 1 mite = 1/8 penny
  • 1 farthing = 1/4 penny
  • 2 farthings = 1 halfpenny
  • 2 halfpence = 1 penny (or a ‘copper')
  • 2 pence = 1 tuppence or a half-groat
  • 3 pence = 1 thruppence
  • 4 pence = 1 groat
  • 6 pence = 1 sixpence (a ‘tanner')
  • 12 pence = 1 shilling (a bob)
  • 2 shillings = 1 florin ( a ‘two bob bit')
  • 2 shillings and 6 pence = 1 half crown
  • 5 shillings = 1 Crown
  • 20 shillings = 1 pound
You missed 21 shillings = 1 Guinea.
 
Yeah, this isn’t very good. China and France should also be there in blue… so it fails at trying to be insulting of the greatest nation in the history of the world,

I propose a much better alternative to your map: There are two types of countries… Those that use the metric system, and those that put a man on the moon.
If you scroll back far enough on the Terrible Maps Twitter feed, that one is there too.
 
This is what Washington was really trying to free America from:
  • 1 mite = 1/8 penny
  • 1 farthing = 1/4 penny
  • 2 farthings = 1 halfpenny
  • 2 halfpence = 1 penny (or a ‘copper')
  • 2 pence = 1 tuppence or a half-groat
  • 3 pence = 1 thruppence
  • 4 pence = 1 groat
  • 6 pence = 1 sixpence (a ‘tanner')
  • 12 pence = 1 shilling (a bob)
  • 2 shillings = 1 florin ( a ‘two bob bit')
  • 2 shillings and 6 pence = 1 half crown
  • 5 shillings = 1 Crown
  • 20 shillings = 1 pound
At today’s inflation rate “tonne” will soon need to be appropriated for money.
 
With pocket calculators!

Pocket calculators didn't come onto the market until the '70s so it was likely slide rules, desktop mechanical calculators, and the full-room computers they were using in the '60s. Impressive!
 
I have a Bachelors in Nuclear Engineering and a Masters in Electrical Engineering. I can appreciate why the metric system is preferable for many engineering calculations, but I also appreciate why our common system works for everyday, ordinary measurements. Even when I lived in Japan, I would convert the listed speed in km/hr to mph as a frame of reference. The fastest speed on the island was on freeways and that was a paltry 80 kph. I almost killed myself and my entire family when I would fly to the States and get in a heavier car and drive 80 mph and failed toa account for following distances.
 
Imperial units have concrete referents. Metric is arbitrary; easier math (sometimes), but harder to “see”.
 
I definitely prefer Fahrenheit to Celsius.

For instance: in Celsius there are 100 degrees between freezing and boiling, whereas in Fahrenheit there are 180 degrees of separation between the two points. This attests to ease in attaining much greater precision.
 
Imperial units have concrete referents. Metric is arbitrary; easier math (sometimes), but harder to “see”.
Sure, but the concrete referents are a little obscure. An inch is defined as the length of three grains of barley, and a pint is defined as the tub of Ben and Jerry's the average american eats in secret while complaining "I just can't seem to lose weight... I'm big boned."
 
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It is interesting that the French attempted to adopt a completely decimal system, even trying a 10-day week (unsuccessfully). The measure of time for a week is not decimal but Creational.
 
I definitely prefer Fahrenheit to Celsius.

For instance: in Celsius there are 100 degrees between freezing and boiling, whereas in Fahrenheit there are 180 degrees of separation between the two points. This attests to ease in attaining much greater precision.
The Celsius system is 0 at the freezing point of water and 100 at the boiling point, but I agree that the Fahrenheit system is preferable, especially when dialing in the temperature of a room.
 
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