An act infinitely transcending nature

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MW

Puritanboard Amanuensis
Hugh Binning, Works, p. 258:

Men that want children, use [are accustomed] to supply their want by adopting some beloved friend in the place of a son; and this is a kind of supply of nature for the comfort of them that want. But it is strange, that God having a Son so glorious, the very character of his person, and brightness of his glory, in whom he delighted from eternity, – strange, I say, that he should in a manner lose and give away his only begotten Son, that he might by his means adopt others, poor despicable creatures, yea, rebellious, to be his sons and daughters. Certainly, this is an act infinitely transcending nature, – such an act that hath an unsearchable mystery in it, into which angels desire to look, and never cease looking, because they never see the bottom of it. It was not out of indigency he did it; not for any need he had of us, or comfort expected from us; but absolutely for our necessity and consolation, that he might have upon whom to pour the riches of his grace.
 
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