Any good literature on miscarriage?

Status
Not open for further replies.

StevieG

Puritan Board Freshman
Earlier in the summer, we found out that we were having another baby, but sadly not long after we announced to everyone, the baby died. This is something that many people don't talk about and it was only after we made it public that others told us it had happened to them and we also heard of it happening to some friends since.

We believe that a baby is alive from conception and wanted to be able to talk about it, mainly now to be able to help others.

Would anyone be able to recommend any good resources on this issue? I was thinking Reformers, puritans and modern writers to see how the church has work though this issue.

(Sorry if I have put this in the wrong place)
 

PaulCLawton

Puritan Board Freshman
Earlier in the summer, we found out that we were having another baby, but sadly not long after we announced to everyone, the baby died. This is something that many people don't talk about and it was only after we made it public that others told us it had happened to them and we also heard of it happening to some friends since.

We believe that a baby is alive from conception and wanted to be able to talk about it, mainly now to be able to help others.

Would anyone be able to recommend any good resources on this issue? I was thinking Reformers, puritans and modern writers to see how the church has work though this issue.

(Sorry if I have put this in the wrong place)

 

Regi Addictissimus

Completely sold out to the King
Earlier in the summer, we found out that we were having another baby, but sadly not long after we announced to everyone, the baby died. This is something that many people don't talk about, and it was only after we made it public that others told us it had happened to them and we also heard of it happening to some friends since.

We believe that a baby is alive from conception and wanted to be able to talk about it, mainly now to be able to help others.

Would anyone be able to recommend any good resources on this issue? I was thinking Reformers, puritans and modern writers to see how the church has work though this issue.

(Sorry if I have put this in the wrong place)

Hello brother,

I can relate. My wife's first, and only time being pregnant, ended in a miscarriage. She had an ectopic pregnancy—the child was stuck and growing in the fallopian tubes. It is very dangerous and was close to erupting her fallopian tubes. We had to rush her to the emergency room.

Fifty percent of cases end in maternal death and lead to an 80+% likelihood of it happening again. My wife has not been able to get pregnant since. We fear that it has caused damage that is preventing her from conceiving. This is a struggle for us.

A book that was of use to us was Hutto's Inheritance of Tears: Trusting the Lord of Life When Death Visits the Womb.


Although we are not giving up on conceiving, we are considering our next steps. Related to that, a friend at Crossway just sent me pdfs of these two titles:



My wife and I will add you to our prayers.
 

StevieG

Puritan Board Freshman
Thanks for your replies, I really appreciate them!

I’ve been really struck how common this is, but not well talked about and will definitely take a look at these suggestions.

I hope everyone is having a blessed Lord’s Day.
 

W.C. Dean

Puritan Board Sophomore
Steve, I am sorry to hear about the earlier death of your child. Although it is not specifically a resource on miscarriage, I recommend B.M. Palmer's The Broken Home. I just published a thread about it. The first whole chapter deals with the loss of his first-born son who died at a very, very young age. Each chapter includes a lesson he learned from the sorrow of the deaths (four other children of his died). It is available from Reformation Heritage Books.
 

ZackF

Puritan Board Post-Graduate
A second for Inheritance of Tears. My wife found it helpful as we’ve gone through at least 3, maybe 4 (not sure) miscarriages.
 

Jonathco

Puritan Board Freshman
Steve, I am praying for you and your wife. My wife and I know this pain all to well, as we experienced it too with our 4th pregnancy. We didn't know anything was wrong, but as my wife was driving with our three children in the car (I was at work), she began to bleed profusely and we lost the baby. It had a profound impact not only on us, but our oldest daughter, who was old enough to comprehend what was happening and unfortunately saw far too much as it unfolded before her in the car.

Lean into God's Word; there are not always clear answers for things like this, but we must learn to trust in the sovereignty of God.

"Our God is in the heavens; he does all that he pleases." Psalm 115:3 ESV

"I form light and create darkness, I make well-being and create calamity, I am the Lord, who does all these things." Isaiah 45:7 ESV
 

Kinghezy

Puritan Board Sophomore
We had a stillbirth in May of this year at 36 weeks. It's been painful, particularly for my wife for many reasons. She has found Nancy Guthrie books on grief helpful (read 1, has 2 others coming), though they're not specific to infant loss. There is "I will Carry You" by Angie Smith (wife of Selah) that she appreciated, though they knew before the loss that the child would die, so it does not approach from a sudden death standpoint. I have Letters from Rutherford, which I plan to read. My pastor had sent a snippet from one letter as an encouragement.
 

RPEphesian

Puritan Board Junior
@StevieG

We've had it happen to us twice. It's still difficult to think about.

It wasn't really going to any books for us, though I remember taking comfort from Spurgeon on infant salvation, who believed every infant without exception goes to heaven. Our pastors and fellow church members had been there for us, and we found others that had experienced the same loss. Those had been our resources.

Before the first instance my attitude was "the judge of all the earth will do right." But when we lost the first one, I entertained no doubts at all that the little one had gone to glory.

The second time was taking refuge in the words of Christ, "Of such is the kingdom of God," along with David's words, "I shall go to him, but he shall not return to me." And David was quite confident, evidenced by the Psalms, that there was an abode for the righteous separate from the wicked. David was sure he would meet his son among the righteous. That's an extraordinary comfort for Christian parents who have lost little ones.

Our little ones have simply been privileged to come immediately before the face of God, sooner than the rest of us. God would rather they worshipped up there rather than here, and they get to be in the immediate presence of Christ. I would never call them back from that for anything.
 
Status
Not open for further replies.
Top