Bavinck, a' Brakel, Turretin, or Muller

Which systematic theology would you buy?

  • a'Brakel

    Votes: 11 28.2%
  • Bavinck

    Votes: 8 20.5%
  • Muller

    Votes: 1 2.6%
  • Turretin

    Votes: 14 35.9%
  • Other. Please specify.

    Votes: 5 12.8%

  • Total voters
    39
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ClayPot

Puritan Board Sophomore
If you have $100 to spend, which systematic theology would you buy? Why? If something else, what would you buy and why? I already have Calvin, Berkhof, and Grudem.
 

Sven

Puritan Board Sophomore
No doubt about it, get Turretin. Muller, BTW, is not a systematic theology; his work is historical theology.
 

D. Paul

Puritan Board Sophomore
No doubt about it, get Turretin. Muller, BTW, is not a systematic theology; his work is historical theology.

I would agree, but be prepared for some intense intellectual exercise. Maybe it's just me, but it has taken hours to work through some of his paragraphs.
 

Sven

Puritan Board Sophomore
Laymen can and ought to read Turretin. When you get your next hundred dollars then you can get 'a Brakel. Get Turretin first though.
 

greenbaggins

Administrator
Staff member
I voted other, because all four are absolutely wonderful, and all four are well worth reading. If I had to choose an order, I would read Turretin first, then Muller, to direct and explain. Then either a'Brakel or Bavinck, both are good. I would read Muller before Bavinck, so that you will know who Bavinck is referring to (Bavinck knew all those post-Reformation authors and quoted them incessantly). You might even consider reading Muller before Turretin, actually, since Muller will help you understand Turretin's context, and why Turretin phrases himself the way he does.
 

BertMulder

Puritan Board Junior
I have Turretin, Brakel and Bavinck. Have used them so far for research reading.

Have almost completed Brakel cover to cover, still need to get to Turretin and Bavinck, as well as finishing reading Calvin cover to cover.
 

TeachingTulip

Puritan Board Sophomore
I voted "other," because even though I am a big Turretin fan, I have not read his entire works. (Which means I need to buy them all.)

It is too bad the poll does not reflect Herman Hoeksema. I have read and would vote for his "Reformed Dogmatics!"
 
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Theogenes

Puritan Board Junior
I voted for a'Brakel because I already have Turretin! :p
(and I don't have a'Brakel yet...) But what about Hodge, Dabney, Thornwell, Reymond, Berkhof, ...
 

DMcFadden

Puritanboard Commissioner
a'Brakel - he will warm your heart, amazingly pastoral

Bavinck - probably the most important dogmatics in the last 100 years from a Reformed perspective

Muller - the David who fought all of the Goliaths of the 20th century revisionists regarding Calvin. Very important, but NOT a systematic theology

Turretin - hard to beat for a confessional Reformed person. Much fuller and more systematic than many of the Reformed titans. Besides, one of my old profs (PCUSA) blamed him (along with Hodge and Warfield) for all things ruinously "rationalistic" with contemporary Calvinism. Reading Turretin sort of gives me a feeling of illicit joy remembering my old prof (who not only wrote against inerrancy but has written in favor of homosexuality).

You can get a'Brakel in digital format. The freebiblesoftware.com folks even have all four volumes in QuickVerse compatible (they even throw in the QV) format. Every few weeks the they give them away for shipping/handling. Just get on their mailing list and wait for it to come along. That way you can invest in print volumes of Turretin or Bavinck (or Muller) and still get your a' Brakel.

E4 Bible Study Library - Vols 1, 2 - KJV Bible; American Standard Version; McCheynne, Sermons and Letters; Ryle, Holiness; Greek New Testament (Textus Receptus); Young's Literal Translation of the Bible; Hodge, Outlines of Theology; à Brakel The Christian’s Reasonable Service, Volume 1 & 2; The Weymouth New Testament; The Westminster Confession and Catechisms; La Biblia (Versión Reina-Valera De 1909); Vincent, A Family Instructional Guide; E4's Naves Topical Bible; Thompson Chain References; Haldane, Commentary on Romans; Hodge, Commentary on Ephesians; Easton's Bible Dictionary; Matthew Henry's Concise Commentary; E4's Hebrew Lexicon; E4's Greek Lexicon E4's Greek Lexicon; Spurgeon, A Collection Of Sermons; E4's Tense Voice Mood; Jonathan Edwards on Revival; Dabney, Systematic Theology; Hodge, Commentary on Westminster Confession; Smeaton, Paul’s Doctrine of the Atonement; Owen, The Glory of the Trinity; Baxter, The Reformed Pastor; Witherow, The Apostolic Church, Which Is It?; Charles Hodge, Sermon Outlines; Guthrie, Your Salvation; Spurgeon, All of Grace

E4 Bible Study Library - Vol 4 - Wilhelmus a’ Brakel The Christian’s Reasonable Service, Vol. 3 & 4; Charles Hodge, Commentary on 1 & 2 Corinthians (2 Volumes); Charles Hodge, Commentary on Romans; Thomas Watson, The Lord’s Prayer; Thomas Watson, The Ten Commandments; John Owen, Communion with God; John Owen, Glory of Christ; A. W. Pink, The Christian Sabbath; Richard Baxter, Saints’ Everlasting Rest.
 
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Sven

Puritan Board Sophomore
I voted "other," because even though I am a big Turretin fan, I have not read his entire works. (Which means I need to buy them all.)

It is too bad the poll does not reflect Herman Hoeksema. I have read and would vote for his "Reformed Dogmatics!"
Don't waste your money on Hoeksema. Get Turretin. Hoeksema has many good things to say, but everything he says that is good is already stated better by other Reformed Theologians. Plus he has several major departures from the Historic Reformed faith such as a denial of the Covenant of Works, a denial of Common Grace, and a denial of the Free Offer of the Gospel.
 

ClayPot

Puritan Board Sophomore
I voted for a'Brakel because I already have Turretin! :p
(and I don't have a'Brakel yet...) But what about Hodge, Dabney, Thornwell, Reymond, Berkhof, ...

I'm sure those are good and I have Berkhof (and Hodge in electronic form I remembered), but I was wanting to focus on the big, multi-volume reformed systematics.
 

Backwoods Presbyterian

Puritanboard Amanuensis
...Besides, one of my old profs (PCUSA) blamed him (along with Hodge and Warfield) for all things ruinously "rationalistic" with contemporary Calvinism. Reading Turretin sort of gives me a feeling of illicit joy remembering my old prof (who not only wrote against inerrancy but has written in favor of homosexuality)...

Let me guess...

Jack Rogers?
 

TeachingTulip

Puritan Board Sophomore
I voted "other," because even though I am a big Turretin fan, I have not read his entire works. (Which means I need to buy them all.)

It is too bad the poll does not reflect Herman Hoeksema. I have read and would vote for his "Reformed Dogmatics!"
Don't waste your money on Hoeksema. Get Turretin. Hoeksema has many good things to say, but everything he says that is good is already stated better by other Reformed Theologians. Plus he has several major departures from the Historic Reformed faith such as a denial of the Covenant of Works, a denial of Common Grace, and a denial of the Free Offer of the Gospel.

Hoeksema's "departure" is simply a rename, calling the covenant one of fellowship, not of works (which Adam's bad works essentially destroyed the fellowship between God and men, yes?)

And, I agree that Hoeksema's teachings against a supposed "common grace" and a supposed "free offer of the gospel" is biblically valid.

Thus the importance of his contributions to sytematic theology.
 

DMcFadden

Puritanboard Commissioner
...Besides, one of my old profs (PCUSA) blamed him (along with Hodge and Warfield) for all things ruinously "rationalistic" with contemporary Calvinism. Reading Turretin sort of gives me a feeling of illicit joy remembering my old prof (who not only wrote against inerrancy but has written in favor of homosexuality)...

Let me guess...

Jack Rogers?

:lol: But of course. Who else? Berkouwer's other famous American doctoral student.
 

Sven

Puritan Board Sophomore
...Besides, one of my old profs (PCUSA) blamed him (along with Hodge and Warfield) for all things ruinously "rationalistic" with contemporary Calvinism. Reading Turretin sort of gives me a feeling of illicit joy remembering my old prof (who not only wrote against inerrancy but has written in favor of homosexuality)...

Let me guess...

Jack Rogers?

:lol: But of course. Who else? Berkouwer's other famous American doctoral student.

You...studied...under...Jack...Rogers??? :wow:
You must be so enlightened.
 
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