Being Baptist under one Covenant?

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Bald_Brother

Puritan Board Freshman
I'm new to the PB, so I spent some time checking out some of the threads from the last few months, to get a better feel for the place. I was flipping through the "Wading Pool" and came across the thread Is the New Covenant brand-spankin' new, or renewed? and as a result have a question for the board.

I adhere wholeheartedly to the 1689 LBCF, however, I don't see how the Westminster Confession and the Baptist confession disagree on the matter of Covenant theology in their respective Chapters VII. And, I admit, though a Baptist, I agree with the WCF here. At the same time I miss the distinction between where I agree with the WCF and the LBCF, other than the detail with which each confession treats the Covenant of God.

1689 London Baptist Confession: Chapter 7:
Of God's Covenant

1. The distance between God and the creature is so great, that although reasonable creatures do owe obedience to him as their creator, yet they could never have attained the reward of life but by some voluntary condescension on God's part, which he hath been pleased to express by way of covenant.
( Luke 17:10; Job 35:7,8 )

2. Moreover, man having brought himself under the curse of the law by his fall, it pleased the Lord to make a covenant of grace, wherein he freely offereth unto sinners life and salvation by Jesus Christ, requiring of them faith in him, that they may be saved; and promising to give unto all those that are ordained unto eternal life, his Holy Spirit, to make them willing and able to believe.
( Genesis 2:17; Galatians 3:10; Romans 3:20, 21; Romans 8:3; Mark 16:15, 16; John 3:16; Ezekiel 36:26, 27; John 6:44, 45; Psalms 110:3 )

3. This covenant is revealed in the gospel; first of all to Adam in the promise of salvation by the seed of the woman, and afterwards by farther steps, until the full discovery thereof was completed in the New Testament; and it is founded in that eternal covenant transaction that was between the Father and the Son about the redemption of the elect; and it is alone by the grace of this covenant that all the posterity of fallen Adam that ever were saved did obtain life and blessed immortality, man being now utterly incapable of acceptance with God upon those terms on which Adam stood in his state of innocency.
( Genesis 3:15; Hebrews 1:1; 2 Timothy 1:9; Titus 1:2; Hebrews 11;6, 13; Romans 4:1, 2, &c.; Acts 4:12; John 8:56 )

Westminster Confession of Faith: Chapter VII

Of God's Covenant with Man

I. The distance between God and the creature is so great, that although reasonable creatures do owe obedience unto Him as their Creator, yet they could never have any fruition of Him as their blessedness and reward, but by some voluntary condescension on God's part, which He has been pleased to express by way of covenant.[1]

II. The first covenant made with man was a covenant of works,[2] wherein life was promised to Adam; and in him to his posterity,[3] upon condition of perfect and personal obedience.[4]

III. Man, by his fall, having made himself incapable of life by that covenant, the Lord was pleased to make a second,[5] commonly called the covenant of grace; wherein He freely offers unto sinners life and salvation by Jesus Christ; requiring of them faith in Him, that they may be saved,[6] and promising to give unto all those that are ordained unto eternal life His Holy Spirit, to make them willing, and able to believe.[7]

IV. This covenant of grace is frequently set forth in scripture by the name of a testament, in reference to the death of Jesus Christ the Testator, and to the everlasting inheritance, with all things belonging to it, therein bequeathed.[8]

V. This covenant was differently administered in the time of the law, and in the time of the Gospel:[9] under the law it was administered by promises, prophecies, sacrifices, circumcision, the paschal lamb, and other types and ordinances delivered to the people of the Jews, all foresignifying Christ to come;[10] which were, for that time, sufficient and efficacious, through the operation of the Spirit, to instruct and build up the elect in faith in the promised Messiah,[11] by whom they had full remission of sins, and eternal salvation; and is called the Old Testament.[12]

VI. Under the Gospel, when Christ, the substance,[13] was exhibited, the ordinances in which this covenant is dispensed are the preaching of the Word, and the administration of the sacraments of Baptism and the Lord's Supper:[14] which, though fewer in number, and administered with more simplicity, and less outward glory, yet, in them, it is held forth in more fullness, evidence, and spiritual efficacy,[15] to all nations, both Jews and Gentiles;[16] and is called the New Testament.[17] There are not therefore two covenants of grace, differing in substance, but one and the same, under various dispensations.[18]

After reading and re-reading and reviewing the supporting Scripture I believe I am able to say that I agree with the London Baptist Confession. The Covenant of Grace was progressively revealed from the first promise to Adam that through the seed of woman there would be salvation, then through the promises to Abraham, Moses, Jacob, David, and the Law and the Prophets - ultimately revealed and fulfilled in Christ's finished work on the Cross and conquering of death in His Resurrection. It is through this finished work, once and for all, that all men who have been saved, from beginning to end, find salvation.

So, I see only one Covenant after the Fall by which "all the posterity of fallen Adam that ever were saved did obtain life and blessed immortality."

I agree with the statement of the WCF that "There are not therefore two covenants of grace, differing in substance, but one and the same, under various dispensations" and it seems to me that the LBCF agrees with the statement "it is alone by the grace of this covenant that all the posterity of fallen Adam that ever were saved did obtain life and blessed immortality, man being now utterly incapable of acceptance with God upon those terms on which Adam stood in his state of innocency."

As for the administration of OT ordinances relative to the NT ordinances , I also agree with the WCF (in this chapter only) on their purpose. I don't see where that differs from the LBCF, where the purposes of the OT ordinances aren't mentioned.

Am I mistaken in my understanding of the LBCF?

Have I become a credo-baptizing, congregational Presbyterian without realizing it?:think:
 

Pergamum

Ordinary Guy (TM)
I also believe that as well.

However, among Calvinistic Baptists this is under attack. Due to the influence of Reisenger and Zaspel and others, calvy baptists sometimes drift into what they refer to as "New Covenant Theology."
 
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