Bunyan on Luther

hammondjones

Puritan Board Sophomore
I find this quote from Grace Abounding to the Chief of Sinners to be fascinating:

Eventually God, who knows us completely, provided me with a book of Martin Luther's - it was his commentary on Galatians. It was so old that it was ready to fall apart at the least touch. I was so glad that such an old book had fallen into my hands! When I started to read it I found that his experiences had been so similar to mine that it was as if the book had been written out of my own heart. I marveled at this - this man couldn't have known what things would be like today, living as he had so long ago!
For reference:
Luther: 1483-1546 (commentary on Galatians 1519)
Bunyan: 1628-1688


Bunyan is probably reading a book that is roughly (only) 150 years old. But he was under the impression that times had changed a lot in those 150 years, which I suppose they had. I think I tend to compress the past the past into a monolithic block, when I suppose was just as dynamic as the present day.
 

JM

Puritan Board Doctor
I find this quote from Grace Abounding to the Chief of Sinners to be fascinating:



For reference:
Luther: 1483-1546 (commentary on Galatians 1519)
Bunyan: 1628-1688


Bunyan is probably reading a book that is roughly (only) 150 years old. But he was under the impression that times had changed a lot in those 150 years, which I suppose they had. I think I tend to compress the past the past into a monolithic block, when I suppose was just as dynamic as the present day.
We all tend to idealize the past.
 

Wretched Man

Puritan Board Freshman
I find this quote from Grace Abounding to the Chief of Sinners to be fascinating:



For reference:
Luther: 1483-1546 (commentary on Galatians 1519)
Bunyan: 1628-1688


Bunyan is probably reading a book that is roughly (only) 150 years old. But he was under the impression that times had changed a lot in those 150 years, which I suppose they had. I think I tend to compress the past the past into a monolithic block, when I suppose was just as dynamic as the present day.
Prior to 100 years ago, the majority of people throughout ~6 millennium of human history were conducting agriculture in similar fashion and rarely left a 7 mile radius.

20 years ago, I was approaching Scripture with a Concordia, book volume commentary sets, access to sermons by one pastor primarily through church service attendance, and trying to hand write notes. Now we have the Bible on our cell phones, needless digital resources (including Google) at our finger tips, countless sermons on sermon audio and YouTube, theology books ready to by searched, ordered, and shipped to you in days, and online blogs.
 
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