Daniel Featley on three-fold righteousness and Christ’s active and passive obedience

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Reformed Covenanter

Cancelled Commissioner
This excellency of the subject notwithstanding ought not to dull the edge of our most diligent search into it, but sharpen it rather, to endeavour so to define justification, that we may justify our definition. Which we cannot do, without distinguishing of a three-fold righteousness: first, a perfect righteousness, but not inherent; of which, 2 Cor. 5.21. secondly, inherent, but not perfect; of which, Luke 1.75. and Apoc. 22.11. thirdly, perfect and inherent, of which, Heb. 12.23. The first, is the righteousness by which we are justified; the second, by which we are sanctified; and the third, by which we are glorified.

The first consisteth as well of Christ’s active as his passive obedience, and in the imputation thereof by faith consisteth the essence of our justification, which may be thus defined: an act of God, whereby he acquitteth every penitent and believing sinner, by not imputing to him his sins, and imputing to him the perfect satisfaction and righteousness of Christ. ...

For more, see Daniel Featley on three-fold righteousness and Christ’s active and passive obedience.
 
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