Didn't Some of the reformers actually prefer Geneva Bible over KJV?

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Dachaser

Puritan Board Doctor
Didn't Some of the reformers actually prefer Geneva Bible over KJV, given that thought the GB was a superior translation?
 
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Ed Walsh

Puritan Board Senior
Didn't Some of the reformers actually prefer Geneva Bible over KJV, given that thought the GB was a superior translation?

Who do you have in mind by the 'reformers?' Calvin died in 1564, Luther in 1546, Zwingli 1531. The KJV was first published in 1611.
 

NaphtaliPress

Administrator
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A new improved English bible was the only real concession the Puritans got from the King at the famous meeting at Hampton Court in 1604. By the time of the Westminster assembly it had supplanted the GB (there was I think just one GB edition just prior to or at the beginning of the assembly and I think all the editions they oversaw some way as censures for quality were KJV editions).
 

Dachaser

Puritan Board Doctor
A new improved English bible was the only real concession the Puritans got from the King at the famous meeting at Hampton Court in 1604. By the time of the Westminster assembly it had supplanted the GB (there was I think just one GB edition just prior to or at the beginning of the assembly and I think all the editions they oversaw some way as censures for quality were KJV editions).
How improved was the 1611 though over the Geneva Bible?
 

NaphtaliPress

Administrator
Staff member
I don't know the quantifier of how much; but deferring to those of the assembly, they viewed it as 'our English translation' or I think Gillespie uses that language in one of his works, and if they thought it was inferior to the GB, when the puritans had control of parliament would have been the time for the GB to be re-favored. It wasn't.
How improved was the 1611 though over the Geneva Bible?
 

bookslover

Puritan Board Doctor
After it was published in 1611, it took about half a century for the KJV to catch on. Many people preferred the Geneva Bible because of its extensive notes. King James made sure that the KJV was note-free.
 

Dachaser

Puritan Board Doctor
After it was published in 1611, it took about half a century for the KJV to catch on. Many people preferred the Geneva Bible because of its extensive notes. King James made sure that the KJV was note-free.
The Geneva was one of the first study bibles, as there were a large amount of notes to help the reader understand the bible better. I believe that the King did not like the Calvinistic notes that seemed to indicate that we should not be under any Earthly King, but just under king Jesus Himself.
 
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