Do You Have An Anger Problem?

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Blueridge Believer

Puritan Board Professor
Anger is a short madness. The less we do when we go mad the better for everybody,
and the less we go mad the better for ourselves.

Do nothing when you are out of temper, and then you will have the less to undo.

Anger does a man more hurt than that which made him angry.

People look none the handsomer for being red in the face.

Remember, anger is temporary insanity.

But oh, beloved, I have no more right as a Christian to suffer bad temper to dwell in
me than I have to suffer the devil himself to dwell there.

When I have a hasty thought against a man and wish him out of the world, I have
killed him in thought, and even though I may disguise the wish under the expression
of wishing him in heaven, there is guilt in the desire. Oh the hard, cruel, black
thoughts which men have towards one another, when they are angry; why they kill
and slay a thousand times over. These hasty sins are soon forgotten by us, but they
are not so soon forgotten by God.

Do you ask, “How can a man master his temper?” In reply, my brethren, I must ask,
how can a man go to heaven if he does not? If the grace of God does not change us
and help us to bridle that lion that is within us, what has it done for us? If a man
says, “I cannot help it,” I cannot help telling him that if there be no help, nothing can
remain for him but despair. Only in salvation from sin is there salvation from wrath.


Fighting sheep are strange animals, and fighting Christians are self-evident
contradictions.

Do not say, “I cannot help having a bad temper.” Friend, you must help it. Pray God
to help you to overcome it at once; for either you must kill it, or it will kill you. You
cannot carry a bad temper into heaven.

I heard one say that he was sorry that he had lost his temper. I was uncommonly
glad to hear that he had lost it, but I regretted that he found it again so soon.

Little pots soon boil over; and I have known some professing Christians, who are
such very little pots, that the smallest fire has made them boil over. When you never
meant anything to hurt their feelings, they have been terribly hurt. The simplest
remark has been taken as an insult, and a construction put upon things that never
was intended, and they make their brethren offenders for a word, or for half a word,
ay, and even for not saying a word.

C.H. SPURGEON
 
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