Does Your Household All Use The Same Bible Translation?

Discussion in 'Family Forum' started by Rutherglen1794, May 22, 2018.

  1. Everyone reads from the same (primary) translation.

    14 vote(s)
    37.8%
  2. Different members of my household have different primary translations.

    23 vote(s)
    62.2%
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  1. Rutherglen1794

    Rutherglen1794 Puritan Board Sophomore

    I feel that not only was rebellion against your king wrong, but so was jettisoning the King's English.

    But let us not derail this thread.
     
  2. Stephen L Smith

    Stephen L Smith Moderator

    I think what Josh is meaning is that both Australia and New Zealand are former British colonies. Therefore our 'outlook' and language in a number of respects is British. The Queen remains head of state in both nations. Thus our English is still, in the main, British English. In terms of the way our Parliaments are run, we operate as Independent nations. That is the British Government has no power over the Australian and New Zealand Parliaments. But our British heritage remains.
     
  3. Dachaser

    Dachaser Puritan Board Professor

    Well, the British have given to us Dr Who and James Bond.
     
  4. JimmyH

    JimmyH Puritan Board Junior

    William Shakespeare, John Milton, Keats, Shelly, and John Donne were no slouches either. :)
     
  5. Herald

    Herald Administrator Staff Member

    My wife uses the NKJV and I use the NASB. It has never been an issue for us.
     
  6. Herald

    Herald Administrator Staff Member

    I needed a good laugh today.
     
  7. Josh Williamson

    Josh Williamson Puritan Board Freshman

    For instance, when I preached through Psalm 113, the CSB uses the word "trash," which isn't a commonly used word here. The congregation said they found that wording distracting and too American. I had to agree.
     
  8. TheOldCourse

    TheOldCourse Puritan Board Sophomore

    What's this kerfluffle all aboot eh?
     
  9. iainduguid

    iainduguid Puritan Board Sophomore

    I used to think that trash was an American word too until I came across it in Gurnall's "Christian in Complete Armour". John Owen also uses it in his commentary in Hebrews. It was actually a good Puritan English word, long before the Americans discovered it. It's time we British knew the history of our own language better.
     
  10. Rutherglen1794

    Rutherglen1794 Puritan Board Sophomore

    Why not use the KJV then if we are handing out points for old words that are no longer used by people today?
     
  11. ZackF

    ZackF Puritan Board Graduate

    I think the word trash is in use today.
     
  12. iainduguid

    iainduguid Puritan Board Sophomore

    No British person misunderstands the meaning of the word "trash", they simply (erroneously) think it to be an American word. Just setting the record straight.

    By the way, I take the point about the potential difficulty of a "foreign-sounding" translation. Even if that perception is mistaken, it could easily be an obstacle. The Presbyterian church in England in the 19th and 20th centuries unfortunately fostered the sense of the exotic foreignness (Scottishness) of their faith by calling most of their churches "St Andrew's" or "St Columba's". Perception matters, which is why the NIV is published in both British and American versions. The KJV is clearly British English rather than American English, but that is not an obstacle in America because British English is generally perceived as "intelligent" and "polite" by Americans, so no one is offended by it.
     
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  13. JimmyH

    JimmyH Puritan Board Junior

    I have anglicized (British) versions of the NIV and ESV, and I prefer those to their American counterparts. Aside from colours instead of colors, for example, there is a dignity to the language lacking in the American versions ...... in my humble opinion.
     
  14. Rutherglen1794

    Rutherglen1794 Puritan Board Sophomore

    You're right. Apparently not commonly used in Brisbane, though.

    Yes, perception does play a large role.

    Not that it matters what I think, but the fact that the CSB is tied to the SBC--especially with what I see going on in the SBC right now with a racialized, social gospel--turns me off from the translation at the outset.

    But all this could be another thread.

    As far as family translation choice goes, I have been ESV since I was saved; but lately I am trending toward the pre-1995 NASB, and very much liking it.

    If someone is reading Scripture, does following along in a different translation take away from your ability to really listen to the words, since you may be comparing or noting differences?
     
  15. Rutherglen1794

    Rutherglen1794 Puritan Board Sophomore

    Brother, the only dignity left in my country is found where she resembles the old Motherland the most. And, not to sound too harsh, but she is most undignified where she has swallowed current American culture hook, line, and sinker.

    Alas, the character of all our nations have changed beyond repair as we have turned away from God.
     
  16. TheOldCourse

    TheOldCourse Puritan Board Sophomore

    As my wife is an almost completely Americanized Canadian, even to the extent of preferring football over hockey and occasionally dropping a y'all, I resemble that remark! Still, this does not explain Newfies! :cheers:
     
  17. Rutherglen1794

    Rutherglen1794 Puritan Board Sophomore

    My British blood (Lowland Scottish--AKA not English-hating Highlander-- & English) boils to read of such things!

    And Newfoundlanders is what happens when the Irish don't have the civilizing influence of old Bristish culture, and are instead left to themselves in the New World. A scary thing.
     
  18. iainduguid

    iainduguid Puritan Board Sophomore

    Once I started thinking about this, it raised a number of interesting questions about unassimilated Britishisms in American translations - for example the rendering of terms for small coins such as "lepton" and "kodranten": the KJV goes with the terms "mite" (which was probably not a current coin even in those days) and "farthing", which is very British. It uses the equally British "penny" for the denarius. The ESV regularly retains the very British penny (following its source, the RSV), and even the supposedly American CSB has "penny" in Matthew 5:26 and 10:29, unlike the genuinely American NASB, which goes with "cent" throughout (CSB has "cent" in Luke 12:59). By the way, this is a great example of dynamic equivalence in the KJV, translating small coins into equivalent familiar small coins, rather than simply transliterating!
     
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  19. TheOldCourse

    TheOldCourse Puritan Board Sophomore

    I still shake my head at Prairie cowboys driving around with Confederate flags on their trucks. What an odd phenomenon! At least you have far less of the French influence in BC!

    But there was a time when even your lowland people were not so eager to adopt the demonym British and also a time when many, especially of Presbyterian and Reformed conviction, sympathized with the American "rebellion." As one of (partial) Scots heritage myself I still am piqued at England's abandonment of the Solemn League and Covenant. I'll take Christ's Crown and Covenant over Charles and Canterbury. :knox:

    I still grant that the Brits, excepting Cockney variants and their ilk, have a far greater command of the language than Americans.

    Anyways, we typically use the AV and ESV in our family. I tend to use the AV more and my wife the ESV but we use both.
     
    Last edited: May 27, 2018
  20. Cymro

    Cymro Puritan Board Junior

    I use the AV for all occasions, and so does my wife. Just can’t understand why Josh keeps using the KJV in every instance. Surely he must have heard of the Alternative Version instead of Knowing Josh’s Version! Not only that but though he is under grace he breaks the law, in that I believe the AV under the law of the realm, is the only Authorised Version to be read in churches. Get with it Josh, and update your reading by joining our AV only society, and be an Advanced Verbalist, renouncing all Americanisms and solely defending the KING JAMES VERSION.
     
  21. Rutherglen1794

    Rutherglen1794 Puritan Board Sophomore

    I sometimes wrestle in my mind about being of both Scottish and English descent, and what my thoughts are about England/the Union, etc.

    I'd be lying if I put on an anti-English bias due to my Scottish roots though. The deal breaker is perhaps that, in her glory days, Canada was mostly a very British nation; therefore, I can consider myself Canadian-British, with Scottish roots.

    I wonder how my family felt about England when they left Glasgow for Canada in the 1820's?
     
  22. Rutherglen1794

    Rutherglen1794 Puritan Board Sophomore

  23. Josh Williamson

    Josh Williamson Puritan Board Freshman

    We certainly know what the word 'trash' means, but it just isn't in common usage here. Nor would do we think that trash was an American invention (the Americans butcher the English language, then us Australians come along and make it worse), but since it is used mostly by Americans, it strikes our ears as being "too American" when it appears in the translation, and distracts the congregation. Due to this the CSB now sits on my shelf, although I do enjoy reading it every now and then.
     
  24. Josh Williamson

    Josh Williamson Puritan Board Freshman

    Haha!

    Her Majesty authorised the printing of the NIV for Her diamond jubilee, so I guess that makes the NIV the New Authorised Version.
     
  25. Stephen L Smith

    Stephen L Smith Moderator

    Josh, you gave us Kiwis some free ammunition :) I met some American Reformed Baptists touring New Zealand a few months ago. They said they loved NZ Fish and Chips. I was very impressed they said Fish and Chips with the same accent as us Kiwis. So the concept of fesh and cheps is foreign to American thinking. :rofl: :rofl:
     
  26. Josh Williamson

    Josh Williamson Puritan Board Freshman

    NZ is the land of the long lost vowel.
     
  27. Logan

    Logan Puritan Board Junior

    The data cannot support that conclusion. One might then also note the sad, steady decline of the use of the word "foot" in our 20th century.

    First, the percentages are so small that we're close to the noise level (two versus eight thousandths of one percent). Second, there may be many factors that contribute to a perceived decline: not just changing language but copyright laws which mean fewer (or certain types) of modern books are indexed, automatically excluding a huge portion of what is being printed today. Third, you're relying on OCR to recognize these words, and not all will be accounted for equally over each time period. Fourth, the decline could be contributed by the number of books indexed from other languages (and their copyright laws) changing over time. Lastly, if you'll draw that graph back to the 1600s, you'll see that the usage of the word appears to have risen (based on the data obtainable), which could lead one to the conclusion that the 1600s were a sad period too!

    Or even changing the time period and being case sensitive, we could be encouraged that "Dignity" has doubled in usage since the 1920s!
     
    Last edited: May 29, 2018
  28. hammondjones

    hammondjones Puritan Board Sophomore

    I thought that was Wales....
     
  29. Rutherglen1794

    Rutherglen1794 Puritan Board Sophomore

    I didn't know that, thanks.
     
  30. Cymro

    Cymro Puritan Board Junior

    With a name like Jones you should know that is not true.:deadhorse:There are 7 vowels in Welsh and only 5 in English.Such is the versatility of the language that there is a poem written on the subject of the spider ,only penned in consonants.
     
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