Edward J. Young on Daniel 9:24

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Herald

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Daniel 9:24 24 Seventy weeks are determined upon thy people and upon thy holy city, to finish the transgression, and to make an end of sins, and to make reconciliation for iniquity, and to bring in everlasting righteousness, and to seal up the vision and prophecy, and to anoint the most Holy.

Regarding "seal up the vision and prophecy", Young writes:

NT prophecy and its fulfillment are yet to be sealed up. Hence, Keil believes that this prophecy is to be fulfilled in the future.

However, the particular description herein chosen very clearly refers to the OT period. Vision was a technical name for revelation given to the OP prophets (c.f. Isa. 1:1, Amos 1:1, etc.) The prophet was the one through whom this vision was revealed to the people. The two words, vision and prophet, therefore, serve to designate the prophetic revelation of the OT period. This revelation was of a temporary, preparatory, typical nature. It pointed forward to the coming of Him who was the great Prophet (Deut. 18:15). When Christ came, there was no further need of prophetic revelation in the OT sense.

This fifth clause seems to stand over the second, for completing sin. When sin is brought to an end by the appearance of the Messiah, so prophecy, which had predicted His coming and His saving work, is no longer needed. It has fulfilled its task and is therefore sealed up.

Edward J. Young "Daniel" (Geneva Series of Commentaries), Banner of Truth Publishing
This may not be revelatory to those who have never been a dispensationalist, but for those of you who have abandoned dispensational theology, Young provides a solid exegetical argument as to what "seal up vision and prophecy" means. It refers to the fulfillment of OT prophecy, but in no way negates NT prophecy that is yet to take place. This was an "Aha!" moment for me.

-----Added 12/13/2008 at 08:45:16 EST-----

Daniel 9 outline:


1.Daniel had the right promise (vs. 1 -2)

1.1 Daniel was well read in the Law and the Prophets (v. 2)
1.2 He knew Jeremiah’s seventieth year was approaching. Jer. 25:11 (v. 2)

2.Daniel had the right attitude (vs. 3 – 15)

2.1 Daniel humbled himself before God (vs. 3)
2.2 Daniel confessed the sin of “all Israel” (vs. 4 – 15)

3.Daniel had the right theology (vs. 16 – 19)

3.1 Daniel confessed that all righteousness belongs to God (v. 16)
3.2 Daniel appealed to God’s sovereign will (vs. 17 – 19)

4.Daniel had the right message (vs. 20 – 27)

4.1 Daniel was visited by Gabriel so that he would have understanding of the prophecy (vs. 21 – 22)
4.2 The command of what will happen in the prophecy in vs. 24-27 (v. 23)
4.3 The restoration of the people would lead to the coming of the Messiah (v. 24 - 25)
4.4 The Messiah will die (v. 26)
4.5 Jerusalem will be judged (v. 26)
4.6 Messiah will confirm the New Covenant (v. 27)
4.7 Messiah will put an end to the need for sacrifice (v. 27)

Conclusion and application: There is no need to fear the future. It is not uncertain, nor is God's purpose for His church. The time for sacrifice and OT prophecy to be fulfilled is past, the time of promise is here, and our future with Christ is secure.
 
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Presbyterian Deacon

Puritan Board Graduate
Daniel 9:27
And he shall confirm the covenant with many for one week: and in the midst of the week he shall cause the sacrifice and the oblation to cease, and for the overspreading of abominations he shall make it desolate, even until the consummation, and that determined shall be poured upon the desolate.


Bill:

Dispensationalists have long held this to be the antiChrist. Of course, we do not agree with their position. This last part of verse 27 is often paired with the passages in Matthew that speak of the "abomination of desolation" to show that this is antiChrist.

What are your thoughts on this last clause of this verse?
 
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Herald

Administrator
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Daniel 9:27
And he shall confirm the covenant with many for one week: and in the midst of the week he shall cause the sacrifice and the oblation to cease, and for the overspreading of abominations he shall make it desolate, even until the consummation, and that determined shall be poured upon the desolate.


Bill:

Dispensationalists have long held this to the antiChrist. Of course, we do not agree with their position. This last part of verse 27 is often paired with the passages in Matthew that speak of the "abomination of desolation" to show that this is antiChrist.

What are your thoughts on this last clause of this verse?

I responded to this on your Facebook question. Here is my answer:

The abomination that causes desolation is the forceful end of the Jewish worship system through the destruction of Jerusalem in AD 70. The abomination is what the Jewish religious system officially becomes after the Messiah is cut off. The 70th week actually ends upon the cutting off of Messiah. The desolation is the result of the Messiah being cut off and the need for sacrifice and observance ended (Heb. 7-10).
 

Herald

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Staff member
Here is my follow-up question?

but the text says he will set up this abomination..."UNTIL the end that is decreed is poured out on him" How do you understand that clause of this verse?

Daniel 9:27 27 "Then he shall confirm a covenant with many for one week; But in the middle of the week He shall bring an end to sacrifice and offering. And on the wing of abominations shall be one who makes desolate, Even until the consummation, which is determined, Is poured out on the desolate."

The first part of this verse refers to Messiah who will confirm the New Covenant (that is the covenant being spoken of). Sacrifice and offering is ended by the Messiah's perfect obedience through the atonement. As to the "one who makes desolate", note that there is no subject as to who this "one" is. There are two views I am considering here. 1. The "one" is Christ, who destroys Jerusalem (and the temple), in AD 70 through Titus. 2. The "one" is what E.J. Young describes as, "impersonal, that which is desolate...there comes a desolator over the temple, and the devastation continues in full, determined end pours forth upon the desolation." In the second view desolation itself is the "one."
 

Presbyterian Deacon

Puritan Board Graduate
It seems the first view (ie-- that "The "one" is Christ, who destroys Jerusalem (and the temple), in AD 70 through Titus"), has some good support:

"Without the slightest doubt, this prophecy was fulfilled when the city was captured and overthrown, and the temple utterly destroyed by Titus the son of Vespasian..."
-- John Calvin on text.
 

Herald

Administrator
Staff member
It seems the first view (ie-- that "The "one" is Christ, who destroys Jerusalem (and the temple), in AD 70 through Titus"), has some good support:

"Without the slightest doubt, this prophecy was fulfilled when the city was captured and overthrown, and the temple utterly destroyed by Titus the son of Vespasian..."
-- John Calvin on text.

Both views see it fulfilled through Titus. Both views would be in agreement that the destruction of Jerusalem was decreed by God. It's a matter of whether the "one" is a first cause (by God), or a second cause because of the perversion of the Jewish religious system.
 

Thomas2007

Puritan Board Sophomore
This may not be revelatory to those who have never been a dispensationalist, but for those of you who have abandoned dispensational theology, Young provides a solid exegetical argument as to what "seal up vision and prophecy" means. It refers to the fulfillment of OT prophecy, but in no way negates NT prophecy that is yet to take place. This was an "Aha!" moment for me.

Many years ago, learning these interpretations of Daniel 9, as well as that mentioned by Sterling in post 2, were "Aha!" moments for me as well. However, I got angry as well. Because I've always tried very hard to live my faith, when I began to understand these things I realized what a prison a wrong teaching had become. The more faithful I tried to live dispensational theology, the more aesthetic I had to become. Coming to the Reformed Faith was a liberating experience for me and enabled me to put forward progressive action into my faith instead of a backward retreat from physical reality.
 
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