For Matt (and the ladies) - Tulip Theme Added

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NaphtaliPress

Administrator
Staff member
It does have this going for it: the Independent making the plea for liberty of conscience in the banner graphic is obscured by the title The Puritan Board.;)
 

Semper Fidelis

2 Timothy 2:24-25
Staff member
:spitlol: :rofl:

I practically fell out of my chair. I don't even know the precise story behind that picture. Do you have any higher-res versions of that picture?
 

NaphtaliPress

Administrator
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Sorry Rich; I don't. I do have a print of it which I paid way too much for; particuarly after finding out more about it. I explained it on a thread but cannot find it via the search. Not sure why.
 

ReformedWretch

Puritan Board Doctor
Ewww...the shade of pink is weird and makes it hard to look at in my opinion. I could live with the flower, but that pink.....

The default is by far the best choice in my opinion though X-factor has a certain coolness to it. But even it is a little "busy" for my tastes.
 

Semper Fidelis

2 Timothy 2:24-25
Staff member
Ewww...the shade of pink is weird and makes it hard to look at in my opinion. I could live with the flower, but that pink.....

The default is by far the best choice in my opinion though X-factor has a certain coolness to it. But even it is a little "busy" for my tastes.

OK, unless you're a LADY or like this guy
25_lyle.jpg


you really shouldn't be providing your thoughts on this theme. ;)
 

VirginiaHuguenot

Puritanboard Librarian
:spitlol: :rofl:

I practically fell out of my chair. I don't even know the precise story behind that picture. Do you have any higher-res versions of that picture?

Years ago, I once owned a copy of the aforementioned painting given to me by James A. Dickson after a rather large book purchase at his Christian bookstore, but later sold it after I learned more about the picture.

The story behind the picture can be found in a review by The Baptist Magazine for 1849, published by the Baptist Missionary Society, Vol. XLI, pp. 494-498.

The painting is by J.R. Herbert [John Rogers Herbert, 1810 - 1890, converted to Roman Catholicism in 1840] (engraved by Samuel Bellin, published by Thomas Agnew) and was first published on December 16, 1848 (first displayed, perhaps, in 1847). It is entitled "Assertion of Liberty of Conscience by the Independents in the Westminster Assembly of Divines, 1644." It shows Philip Nye arguing against Presbyterianism in that it was unfavorable to civil liberty. The prospectus that accompanied the publication of this painting makes unsubstantianted claims about Philip Nye's specific words, but the gist of it is that the painting purports to show the Independent's argument against Presbyterianism, with a revisionist or poetic attempt to show Oliver Cromwell, John Owen and John Milton in attendance, none of whom are known to have actually been present.

It's a beautiful picture which glorifies the Independents in the Westminster Assembly, while containing a number of historical inaccuracies (acknowledged and decried in the Baptist article referenced above).

That, in a nutshell, is the story behind the picture.
 
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