Furnishings from the most holy place carried off with the Vandal sack of Rome in 455

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Relztrah

Puritan Board Freshman
I am reading Gibbons's History of the Decline and Fall of the Roman Empire on my iPad in short, 20-minute segments while I'm on the exercycle at the YMCA. At this rate I calculate that I'll complete it at age 168. But I am far enough along that I have reached the Vandal sack of Rome in 455. Here is the section that I am curious about:

Since the abolition of Paganism, the Capitol had been violated and abandoned; yet the statues of the gods and heroes were still respected, and the curious roof of gilt bronze was reserved for the rapacious hands of Genseric. The holy instruments of the Jewish worship, the gold table, and the gold candlestick with seven branches, originally framed according to the particular instructions of God himself, and which were placed in the sanctuary of his temple, had been ostentatiously displayed to the Roman people in the triumph of Titus. They were afterwards deposited in the temple of Peace; and at the end of four hundred years, the spoils of Jerusalem were transferred from Rome to Carthage, by a Barbarian who derived his origin from the shores of the Baltic.​
There are a couple of footnotes in this paragraph, but neither of them provides any clarity as to the historicity of the temple furnishings being still extant in the fifth century. (Well, one of them might, but it refers to a work in Latin.) So my question is: Were these items in fact in Herod's temple? If so, did they survive the destruction of Jerusalem, remain preserved through the centuries, get transferred to Rome and finally carried off in the the sack of 455 as Gibbons claims?

I assumed that these temple furnishings were destroyed along with the arc and were not present in Herod's temple. But this is just an assumption, I don't have biblical or historical evidence to support this.

Much of Gibbon has been refuted and corrected, and perhaps this is a point of disagreement by later historians of the Roman Empire. Have any of you done any research on this matter?
 
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