God is love (Octavius Winslow)

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Reformed Covenanter

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It is a self-evident truth, that as God only knows, so He only can reveal His own love. It is a hidden love, veiled deep within the recesses of His infinite heart, yea, it seems to compose His very essence, for “God is love," -- not merely lovely and loving, but love itself, essential love. Who, then, can reveal it but himself?

Octavius Winslow, The Glory of the Redeemer in his Person and Work (2nd edn, London: John F. Shaw, 1845), p. 55.
 

Stephen L Smith

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I have just started reading Winslow's 'Help Heavenward'. It is now out of print so I was thankful to find a second hand copy online. He is always spiritually edifying. He is one of my 'go to' writers if I need to be encouraged.
 

Reformed Covenanter

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I have just started reading Winslow's 'Help Heavenward'. It is now out of print so I was thankful to find a second hand copy online. He is always spiritually edifying. He is one of my 'go to' writers if I need to be encouraged.

I bought that book on Tuesday along with his sermons on Psalm 130, Soul Depths & Soul Heights, which I am currently reading. He is one author that I have neglected as a result of not liking a book that I read by him when I was nineteen.
 

Stephen L Smith

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I bought that book on Tuesday along with his sermons on Psalm 130, Soul Depths & Soul Heights, which I am currently reading. He is one author that I have neglected as a result of not liking a book that I read by him when I was nineteen.
I hope your previous dislike turns into a real appreciation. Read 'Help Heavenward', you will be edified. Spurgeon was not too excited about his Psalm 130 (he preferred Owen's work on the Psalm) but acknowledges that Winslow is "good, sound, and spiritual".
Just to balance my other post, here is a discussion by the PCA pastor and Jonathan Edwards scholar Dr M Everhard. He tends to defend the CT but speaks very fairly towards the TR and actually defends some TR readings. He is gracious and gentle in the discussion. I appreciate that.

I pressed play because I thought that I was going to get to see someone playing Street Fighter II. Once that did not materialise, I switched it off. ;)
You switched off that spiritually minded video because you preferred Street Fighter II. You do need to read Winslow's 'Spiritual Declension and Revival of Religion in the Soul'. I could not resist that one :D
 

Reformed Covenanter

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I hope your previous dislike turns into a real appreciation. Read 'Help Heavenward', you will be edified. Spurgeon was not too excited about his Psalm 130 (he preferred Owen's work on the Psalm) but acknowledges that Winslow is "good, sound, and spiritual".

It has already; I do not think the book on Psalm 130 is as good as the others that I have read recently (The Glory of the Redeemer, No Condemnation in Christ Jesus, and The Work of the Holy Spirit), but those were of an extremely high standard.

You switched off that spiritually minded video because you preferred Street Fighter II. You do need to read Winslow's 'Spiritual Declension and Revival of Religion in the Soul'. I could not resist that one :D

To be fair, watching Street Fighter II would be more edifying and less contentious than listening to a discussion of textual criticism. ;)
 

Reformed Covenanter

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Spurgeon was not too excited about his Psalm 130 (he preferred Owen's work on the Psalm) but acknowledges that Winslow is "good, sound, and spiritual".

I actually had to laugh at old Charlie's play on the title of Octavius's book: "CXXX.—WINSLOW (OCTAVIUS, D.D.) Soul-Depths and Soul-Heights; an Exposition of Psalm CXXX. Cr. 8vo. Lond., J. F. Shaw. 1874. Not very deep nor very high, but pleasant spiritual reading." :lol: (See the reference in the Spurgeon Archive.)
 

Stephen L Smith

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I actually had to laugh at old Charlie's play on the title of Octavius's book: "CXXX.—WINSLOW (OCTAVIUS, D.D.) Soul-Depths and Soul-Heights; an Exposition of Psalm CXXX. Cr. 8vo. Lond., J. F. Shaw. 1874. Not very deep nor very high, but pleasant spiritual reading." :lol: (See the reference in the Spurgeon Archive.)
Spurgeon was beloved for his humour. :cool:

I meant to include this booklet by Winslow "Go Tell Jesus". I was greatly edified by it and I am sure PB readers will be too.
 

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Stephen L Smith

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I actually had to laugh at old Charlie's play
"The summer holidays had ended. The opening day of a new session was ever a time of glad greetings, and of pleasant preparations for the tasks which lay before us. Old friends were speaking mutual welcomes, and new students were regarded with kindly curiosity. The tutors were heartily received, as being at once our fathers and our brothers; for so was it ever in the days of Messrs. George Rogers, David Gracey, and Archibald Fergusson; while the dear President, C. H. Spurgeon, was still the best-loved,—most paternal and most fraternal of all.
"On the morning to which I now refer, the three tutors were in their places on the platform in the College lecture-hall, and nearly a hundred of us occupied the benches. The venerable and venerated George Rogers was telling, in characteristic fashion, how he had spent the vacation: attending recognition services, delivering charges, preaching sermons, and speaking at various meetings in places where 'our own men' were doing the Great Master's work. The dear old man could never resist an opportunity of making some playful allusion to his own Paedo-Baptist views, in contrast with those which his hearers held,—always to the advantage of his own position, of course. An observation of this kind, which had just fallen from his lips, led Professor Gracey to interject the sentence, 'But you won't be baptized.' 'Yes, I will,' replied the nimble-witted sage, 'if you'll let me stand up to be done!' But the Irish wit of the classical tutor was equally quick, and he answered, 'We're quite willing to let you stand up if only the water is deep enough!'—a retort which the students emphasized with a merry peal of laughter and ringing cheers. 'Ah!' said the old man, in the familiar tone which always seemed gravest when his spirit was gayest, 'you can't find anything deep enough for Mr. Gracey!
"In the very midst of the applause which followed this smart rejoinder, in came the President! Only those who knew how much he was beloved, and what a gladsome spirit of freedom was always associated with his coming upon such a scene, could have understood, or perhaps excused, the boisterous burst of welcome—laughter, cheers, and a general din of delight,—which sent the echoes flying about the lecture-room for a while. Ere the noise subsided, Mr. Spurgeon had reached the platform steps, where he paused,—lifted his right hand,—and exclaimed, 'Brethren! brethren! I feel like Moses coming down from the mount; true, there isn't much music, you are not exactly dancing, but you are making a great row; and, lo! I see that you are worshipping—an Essex calf!' In an instant, Mr. Rogers had seized the sharp shaft of good-tempered humour, and, with exquisite grace and skill, had sent it flying back, by simply and swiftly dropping into his chair, with a profound and courtly bow, leaving the President standing alone upon the platform, himself the Essex calf to whom the homage was being rendered! A more perfect tu quoque in action could not be conceived, and no words can indicate the wonderful way in which it was done. It was the wittiest thing I ever saw, even from the most witty of octogenarians whom I have ever met. But the merry scene was not quite at an end even then. 'Well, friend Rogers, what does all the noise mean?' asked the genial 'Governor.' 'Oh, sir! Mr Gracey has been trying to put me down.' Like a flash came the Roland for the Oliver. 'Why, that's what I have been trying to do for the last twenty years, you old sinner, and you won't go down!'
"All the sparkling fun lingers in the memory,—pure as the holy joy of angels;—for there strangely mingles with it the recollection of the hallowed moments spent at the throne of grace before the threatenings ended; and between the playfulness and the prayer there seemed to be no abrupt transition, no discord, no incongruity,—but all was perfect harmony and happiness."
From "Pure fun" https://archive.spurgeon.org/misc/abio081.php
 
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