Guess What I Gave Up for Lent?

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Marrow Man

Drunk with Powder
Question: Guess what I gave up for lent?

:bueller:








Answer: Romish holidays!

Sorry, old joke of mine. I hope no one was offended.
 

Theogenes

Puritan Board Junior
Tim,
If I'm asked what I gave up for lent, I'll say that I gave up lent for lent...:eek:

I stole that from someone...:)
 

SolaScriptura

Puritanboard Snowflake
I eat more during Lent. When I go to lunch with my RC friends I ask them to buy for me since they're not eating. Ain't I a stinker???
 

Theognome

Burrito Bill
I'd love to give it up, but I can't. Every time I use the clothes dryer, it just keeps showing up again...


Theognome
 

etexas

Puritan Board Doctor
Question: Guess what I gave up for lent?

:bueller:








Answer: Romish holidays!

Sorry, old joke of mine. I hope no one was offended.
No offence taken!:):):) I do follow the Western Calendar (Liturgical) however, there is a longstanding "truce" between myself the Admins. Mods. and long time members, I don't bring up the the seasons and everyone is cool.:) Grace And Peace.
 

Marrow Man

Drunk with Powder
It's sort of funny (weird funny, not funny ha-ha) last year during "Lent" season here in Louisville (Louisville is a big time RC town for those who don't know), almost all of the fast food restaurants were advertising fish sandwiches on their marquee signs. And I mean nearly every one to a restaurant (well, except maybe KFC). Let's just say that sort of thing doesn't happen down in the more heavily Prot south.

Oh well, neither a borrower nor a lenter be, as they say...

-----Added 2/24/2009 at 09:31:58 EST-----

No offence taken!:):):) I do follow the Western Calendar (Liturgical) however, there is a longstanding "truce" between myself the Admins. Mods. and long time members, I don't bring up the the seasons and everyone is cool.:) Grace And Peace.
I had two Reformed Episcopals today point out to me today they were having pancake suppers tonight (one was at the IHOP!). Is that a "Fat Tuesday" sort of tradition?
 

etexas

Puritan Board Doctor
It's sort of funny (weird funny, not funny ha-ha) last year during "Lent" season here in Louisville (Louisville is a big time RC town for those who don't know), almost all of the fast food restaurants were advertising fish sandwiches on their marquee signs. And I mean nearly every one to a restaurant (well, except maybe KFC). Let's just say that sort of thing doesn't happen down in the more heavily Prot south.

Oh well, neither a borrower nor a lenter be, as they say...

-----Added 2/24/2009 at 09:31:58 EST-----

No offence taken!:):):) I do follow the Western Calendar (Liturgical) however, there is a longstanding "truce" between myself the Admins. Mods. and long time members, I don't bring up the the seasons and everyone is cool.:) Grace And Peace.
I had two Reformed Episcopals today point out to me today they were having pancake suppers tonight (one was at the IHOP!). Is that a "Fat Tuesday" sort of tradition?
Funny you should ask, I went to Church for pancakes, IHOP, I think for the first time offered free "short-stacks" guts for IHOP in a post-Christian era! :) Made a bunch of Orthodox Anglicans and Roman Catholics happy.:lol:
 

JM

Puritan Board Doctor
I thought you were going to give up pork after listening to the Osteen vid.
 

Classical Presbyterian

Puritan Board Junior
I loosely follow the Liturgical Calendar. I use Lent as a season to call the church to repentance and a renewed sense of knowing how great a salvation we have in the atoning death of Christ. There is a rich tradition of Anglican Reformed thought that we should not lose. Sure, we might not use all of it, but there is always something to not excluding what is a part of our tradition and history.
 

etexas

Puritan Board Doctor
I loosely follow the Liturgical Calendar. I use Lent as a season to call the church to repentance and a renewed sense of knowing how great a salvation we have in the atoning death of Christ. There is a rich tradition of Anglican Reformed thought that we should not lose. Sure, we might not use all of it, but there is always something to not excluding what is a part of our tradition and history.
I posted a Prayer from tonight's service that is great, it is from the BCP 1662 Revised but applies to ALL Christians whether you follow the Liturgical Year or not. It is a wonderful prayer of reflection.
 

Marrow Man

Drunk with Powder
I loosely follow the Liturgical Calendar. I use Lent as a season to call the church to repentance and a renewed sense of knowing how great a salvation we have in the atoning death of Christ. There is a rich tradition of Anglican Reformed thought that we should not lose. Sure, we might not use all of it, but there is always something to not excluding what is a part of our tradition and history.
Toby, I don't have any problem with Christians using certain times of the year to reflect more closely upon the work of Christ. It's just the ceremony and false piety that often accompany these seasons. And there's a subtle underlying thread in some circles -- Christ's death is not enough, something else must be added, given up, whatever.

Then there's that whole RPW thing. ;)

But on a serious note (and along the lines that Toby stated above), I found this book recommended (Monergism.com is selling copies for only $3.75 right now!) and I ordered a whole bunch to give away to my congregation (well, technically, it's Jesus' congregation, but you know what I mean).

 

Whitefield

Puritan Board Junior
I don't have any problem with Christians using certain times of the year to reflect more closely upon the work of Christ. It's just the ceremony and false piety that often accompany these seasons. And there's a subtle underlying thread in some circles -- Christ's death is not enough, something else must be added, given up, whatever.
abusus non tollit usum

misuse does not nullify proper use
 

etexas

Puritan Board Doctor
I don't have any problem with Christians using certain times of the year to reflect more closely upon the work of Christ. It's just the ceremony and false piety that often accompany these seasons. And there's a subtle underlying thread in some circles -- Christ's death is not enough, something else must be added, given up, whatever.
abusus non tollit usum

misuse does not nullify proper use
I really LIKE that! :up: I was telling a Brother, in the REC our view of this season is VASTLY different than Rome's! We ONLY reflect on the FINISHED work of our Blessed Saviour we reflect in this time what he accomplished for His Elect. We teach the concept that one can "add merit" or can become "more Holy" than that imputed by the Finished Work of Christ, is a (39 Articles) VAIN THING. Rome....with certain days teaches "special forgiveness" or "Blessed Merits" again for us this is an abomination! We are blessed in Christ and his finished Work. Amen.
 

reformed trucker

Puritan Board Sophomore
I think I'll give up the NIV for lent. And liberalism. Why not go whole hog?
:lol::ditto:

I use the ESV now because that is what they use where I attend. At my last church they used the NIV. Being a KJV guy, I liked to give my friends the raspberries that the NIV was a good "starter bible"!;)
 

Curt

Puritan Board Graduate
We'll have an Ash Wednesday service tomorrow - ashes and all. The point is that it's another opportunity to talk about repentance and the wirk of Christ. We'll talk about the season leading up to Resurrection Sunday and reflection - not on our navels or giving up chocolate - but on the goodness of God.
 

lynnie

Puritan Board Graduate
My BIL used to work at a pizza place years ago. Every Friday all the good Catholics who could not eat meat ordered pizza. He said they were so swamped on Fridays during Lent it was unbearable.

Such sacrifice........
 

Marrow Man

Drunk with Powder
We'll have an Ash Wednesday service tomorrow - ashes and all. The point is that it's another opportunity to talk about repentance and the wirk of Christ. We'll talk about the season leading up to Resurrection Sunday and reflection - not on our navels or giving up chocolate - but on the goodness of God.
I've been having a bit of fun on this thread, but this is an absolutely dead serious question. My experience with Baptists is that they tend to have a view of all things liturgical in most cases (and I don't mean a thing positive or negative by that). Yet, I've known Baptist churches to celebrate special liturgical seasons (lighting Advent wreaths and having Ash Wednesday services as you mentioned). I don't understand the disjunction. Can you enlighten me?
 

Curt

Puritan Board Graduate
We'll have an Ash Wednesday service tomorrow - ashes and all. The point is that it's another opportunity to talk about repentance and the wirk of Christ. We'll talk about the season leading up to Resurrection Sunday and reflection - not on our navels or giving up chocolate - but on the goodness of God.
I've been having a bit of fun on this thread, but this is an absolutely dead serious question. My experience with Baptists is that they tend to have a view of all things liturgical in most cases (and I don't mean a thing positive or negative by that). Yet, I've known Baptist churches to celebrate special liturgical seasons (lighting Advent wreaths and having Ash Wednesday services as you mentioned). I don't understand the disjunction. Can you enlighten me?
Tim, I'll try. First, I pastor a Baptist congregation, but I'm not really a Baptist. I'm a Reformed Christian with Presbyterian understandings who pastors a Baptist congregation. I graduated from Covenant Seminary and was ordained in the RPC,ES.

That said, I try to demystify some of the things that Baptists tend to throw out because they remind them of the RCC. There's a lot to learn and understand about Jesus' time in the desert. Utilizing the concept of lent can be helpful in that.

BTW, I don't do the advent wreath thing. I see a big difference between Easter, a true Christian holiday, and Christmas.

Hope this helps. I did, BTW, understand the "bit of fun" aspect of the thread.
 

tdowns

Puritan Board Junior
Solomon Kane,

Tim,
If I'm asked what I gave up for lent, I'll say that I gave up lent for lent...:eek:

I stole that from someone...:)
Sorry, :offtopic:

Jim, is that Solomon Kane as your avatar?

Great tales of adventure!

As Wik says, "Solomon Kane is a fictional character created by the pulp-era writer Robert E. Howard. A 17th century Puritan, Solomon Kane is a somber-looking man who wanders the world with no apparent goal other than to vanquish evil in all its forms."

Classic!

I say no to lent...in dryer and out.
 

Rangerus

Puritan Board Junior
Tim,
If I'm asked what I gave up for lent, I'll say that I gave up lent for lent...:eek:

I stole that from someone...:)
That's awesome! I just made it my facebook status.
Good idea! That shall be my FB on the morrow!
haha I had actually typed it in my 'status' line, but right before I pressed post, i decided to delete it. I probably have a few yet-reformed friends that just might not see the humor in it.:think:
 

travis

Puritan Board Freshman
Had Ash Wednesday services this morning with communion and imposition of ashes. The focus was on the finished work of Christ and a season of repentance to remind us that it should be a season that lasts our entire life. The imposition of ashes was described as an outward sign of an inner process, not as a pious symbol.

The service was great, we celebrated the meal together and those that chose to had the ashes placed on their forehead. I was raised Roman Catholic and remember the Ash Wed services I used to attend so I felt uneasy about partaking myself but rejoiced with those who did.

-----Added 2/25/2009 at 10:43:15 EST-----

Also, I gave up beer for lent :). Am replacing my relaxing after work beer with prayer and scripture.

Scotch will end the night, however :lol:
 
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