"He came unto his own" (Thomas Aquinas)

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Reformed Covenanter

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Thomas Aquinas had an unusual view of John 1:11 (unusual to me, at least):

He came, I say, unto his own, i.e., to Judea, according to some, because it was in a special way his own. In Judea God is known (Ps 75:1); the vineyard of the Lord of hosts is the house of Israel (Isa 5:7). But it is better to say, unto his own, i.e., into the world created by him. The earth is the Lord’s (Ps 23:1).

Thomas Aquinas, Super Evangelium S. Ioannis Lectura (1270-72), C.1.L6.n143.2.
 

Reformed Covenanter

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Oddly, Aquinas later says that "his own" who did not receive him were the Jews:

But it is better to say, his own, i.e., the Jews, did not receive him, through faith by believing, and by showing honor to him. I have come in the name of my Father, and you do not receive me (John 5:43), and I honor my Father, and you have dishonored me (John 8:49). Now the Jews are his own because they were chosen by him to be his special people. The Lord chose you to be his special people (Deut 26:18). They are his own because they are related according to the flesh, from whom is Christ, according to the flesh (Rom 9:3). They are also his own because they are enriched by his kindness, I have reared and brought up sons (Isa 1:2). But although the Jews were his own, they did not receive him.

Thomas Aquinas, Super Evangelium S. Ioannis Lectura (1270-72), C.1.L6.n145.2.
 
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