How many of the books have you read?

How many have you read?

  • 0 books

    Votes: 5 22.7%
  • 1 book

    Votes: 3 13.6%
  • 2 books

    Votes: 3 13.6%
  • 3 books

    Votes: 2 9.1%
  • 4 books

    Votes: 0 0.0%
  • 5 books

    Votes: 3 13.6%
  • 6 books

    Votes: 0 0.0%
  • 7 books

    Votes: 0 0.0%
  • 8 books

    Votes: 0 0.0%
  • 9 books

    Votes: 1 4.5%
  • 10 books

    Votes: 1 4.5%
  • 11 books

    Votes: 1 4.5%
  • 12 books

    Votes: 3 13.6%

  • Total voters
    22
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blhowes

Puritan Board Professor
Sometimes when I'm reading posts, I'll click on a link to a person's church, just out of curiosity. When Curt mentioned he was a citizen of Red Sox nation, he caught my attention so I clicked on the link to his church.

When I got to his church's website, there was a link to The Puritan Reading Challenge. I liked the idea of encouraging people in his flock to read Puritan books. Here's the list they've been going through this year:

January: The Bruised Reed by Richard Sibbes (128 pp)
February: The Mystery of Providence by John Flavel (221 pp)
March: The Godly Man’s Picture by Thomas Watson (252 pp)
April: Precious Remedies Against Satan’s Devices by Thomas Brooks (253 pp)
May: Come and Welcome to Jesus Christ by John Bunyan (225 pp)
June: The Mortification of Sin by John Owen (130 pp)
July: A Lifting Up for the Downcast by William Bridge (287 pp)
August: The Rare Jewel of Christian Contentment by Jeremiah Burroughs (228 pp)
September: The True Bounds of Christian Freedom by Samuel Bolton (224 pp)
October: The Christian’s Great Interest by William Guthrie (207 pp)
November: The Reformed Pastor by Richard Baxter (256 pp)
December: A Sure Guide to Heaven by Joseph Alleine (148 pp)

I'm sure I'm probably in the lower percentile compared to many of you. I've only read two: The Mystery of Providence by John Flavel and The Christian’s Great Interest by William Guthrie. How about you?
 

Galatians220

Puritan Board Post-Graduate
Five: "The Bruised Reed," "The Godly Man's Picture," "The Mortification of Sin," "A Lifting Up for the Downcast," and "The Reformed Pastor."

Can't take any personal credit for it; our proximity to the Holy Land (Grand Rapids) has resulted in numerous, book-buying trips there and recommendations by pastors and others at, for example, the old Kregel's and lately, PRTS.

All of these books are well worth reading, BTW. Thanks for the list.

Margaret
 

Augusta

Puritan Board Doctor
I have read 5 of them. I am waaaaayyyyy behind in the puritan challenge but I am still going just at my own pace now.

The Bruised Reed by Richard Sibbes

The Mystery of Providence by John Flavel

The Godly Man’s Picture by Thomas Watson

Precious Remedies Against Satan’s Devices by Thomas Brooks (I am not quite done with this one)

The True Bounds of Christian Freedom by Samuel Bolton
 

Curt

Puritan Board Graduate
Our entire congregation, including me, is behind in the challenge. That's OK, we haven't given up. It may take three years. The discussions we've had about these books when we get together have been marvelous.
 

Presbyterian Deacon

Puritan Board Graduate
I have read them all. Not all this year, mind you...and not as part of the Puritan Reading Challenge-- but I have, over the years read them all, and a few more besides.

Other notable Puritan Paperbacks by Banner of Truth are:

Heaven on Earth by Thomas Brooks (320 pages)
All Loves Excelling by John Bunyan (124 pages)
Glorious Freedom by Richard Sibbes (194 pages)
The Doctrine of Repentance by Thomas Watson (122 pages)
Prayer by John Bunyan (172 pages)
All Things for Good by Thomas Watson (127 pages)
Letters of Samuel Rutherford (198 pages)
The Shorter Catechism Explained from Scripture by Thomas Vincent (282 pages)
Apostacy From the Gospel by John Owen (166 pages)
The Glory of Christ by John Owen (168 pages)
The Sinfulness of Sin by Ralph Venning (284 pages)
Communion with God by John Owen (209 pages)
The Great Gain of Godliness by Thomas Watson (166 pages)
The Art of Prphesying by William Perkins (191 pages)
Learning in Christ's School by Ralph Venning (273 pages)
The Lord's Supper by Thomas Watso (86 pages)
 

pm

Puritan Board Freshman
Struggle with reading

I know reading is important, but some of us really struggle with reading, it is
a challenge and I have never been good at it, but I try. What I do read I
understand well, I have a friend who reads 10 times what I do, but retains
little. But I am good at other things, just not reading.

If I can say this without sounding judgemental, but it seems to me that
talking about the number of books one reads, is a tad like boasting.
 

blhowes

Puritan Board Professor
I know reading is important, but some of us really struggle with reading, it is
a challenge and I have never been good at it, but I try. What I do read I
understand well, I have a friend who reads 10 times what I do, but retains
little. But I am good at other things, just not reading.
I'm with ya on this one. I'm a slow reader, dwarfed by many/most (probably close to all) on this board. I read what I can when I can at the speed I can.
If I can say this without sounding judgemental, but it seems to me that
talking about the number of books one reads, is a tad like boasting.
I don't quite see it that way, but that's ok. I liked the idea of a church encouraging their people to read puritan literature. It was Friday, the end of a hard work week, so having a poll that doesn't tax the brain just seemed the thing to do.
 

blhowes

Puritan Board Professor
...and besides, if you're like me, you're not in full time ministry as a pastor or elder, so its not required reading for us. That's why they pay these guys the big bucks so they can read them and tell us all about them. :lol:
 

pm

Puritan Board Freshman
Here I am going to contradict myself.

I am reading "The Life of Arthur W. Pink" by Iain H. Murry.

Pink was originally a Fundamentalist and Dispensationalist
and later turned against these beliefs.

Murry says one of the main reasons was Pink reading the old Puritan
authors. Pink started wondering that if Fundamentalist and
Dispensationalist were so correct, why had not God revealed
these ideas to great men of God in the past. That started him
on a quest, if you will.

Pink was an avid reader that would put us all to shame.
Murry said that in one 3 month period Pink read 45 books,
and this was not light reading (page 55)

To understand the God of the Bible, we need to understand
what God has revealed to the great godly men of the past,
Biblically, we don't live in a vacuum!
 

Blueridge Believer

Puritan Board Professor
The only one of the puritan challange I have yet to read this year is "A sure guide to Heaven". Plan on starting it in the next couple of days.
 

christiana

Puritan Board Senior
I copied that list and sent it to many of my friends with a challenge to read them in 2009. I am excited about it as it is a great list and many of my friends are not reformed! I am excited to think of how our Lord may work in their hearts if they accept this challenge! I definitely will be doing it and so far have received back two affirmatives with questions as to where to get the books! I would appreciate your prayers for this time of reading His great truths!
 
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