Huguenot Art

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VirginiaHuguenot

Puritanboard Librarian
One feature of the Huguenot movement in France was that it included an extremely large proportion of artisans and craftsmen. This worked do France's disadvantage when Huguenots were forced out of the country before and after the 1685 Revocation of the Edict of Nantes (ie., Huguenot Diaspora). But it was to the advantage of the rest of the world wherever Huguenots settled and brought their talents and skills.

Some comments from the most well-known of French Huguenots on art:

"œAll arts proceed from God and ought to be held as divine interventions" -- John Calvin

"œSculpture and painting are gifts of God" -- John Calvin

"œAmong other things adapted for men´s recreation and giving them pleasure, music is either the foremost, or one of the principal; and we must esteem it a gift of God designed for that purpose" -- John Calvin

Some famous French Huguenot artists, whose works may still be seen today in museums or books, include the following:

Jacques La Moyne (1533 - 1588) -- Artist (the first European artist to draw pictures of places, people and things in the New World) -- http://fcit.usf.edu/florida/photos/native/lemoyne/lemoyne.htm

http://www.factmonster.com/ipka/A0921316.html

Bernard Palissy (1509 - 1590) -- Potter, painter -- http://www.getty.edu/art/collections/bio/a867-1.html

Paul Revere (1735 - 1818) -- Silversmith -- http://www.tfaoi.com/aa/1aa/1aa467.htm

Paul de Lamerie (1688 - 1751) -- Craftsman -- http://www.rauantiques.com/Articles.asp?ArticleID=28

Huguenot Silvermaking in England (1680 - 1760) -- http://www.absolutearts.com/artsnews/1999/09/18/25949.html

http://www.christopherhartop.com/huguenot.html

Music
Clement Marot (1496 - 1544) & Louis Bourgeois (1510 - 1561) -- Poets, Composers -- http://spindleworks.com/library/deddens/psalmOrigins.htm

http://www.cyberhymnal.org/bio/b/o/u/bourgeois_l.htm

http://www.redeemer.on.ca/academics/polisci/psalter.html

And sometimes, the Huguenots just inspired good art:

http://www.victorianweb.org/painting/millais/paintings/huguenot.html

[Edited on 15-1-2005 by VirginiaHuguenot]
 

Ivan

Pastor
That's one of the things I respect about the Reformed faith...the balance that it brings to one's life. I think Calvin's perspective on the arts is one aspect of that.
 

puriteen18

Puritan Board Freshman
Don't forget Claude Goudimel. His devotional arrangements of the Genevan psalm-tunes are absolutely wonderful.
http://www.credenda.org/issues/11-5musica.php


You all might find this book interesting. If I remember correctly it does have sections about the huguenot craftsmens, and of course included alot of other Reformed trads.

Seeing Beyond the Word. Visual Arts and the Calvinist Tradition.
(Ed.) by Paul Corby Finney

I've only skimmed through in a bookstore; it is always out of my price range. But it looks interesting.
 

VirginiaHuguenot

Puritanboard Librarian
Originally posted by puriteen18
Don't forget Claude Goudimel. His devotional arrangements of the Genevan psalm-tunes are absolutely wonderful.
http://www.credenda.org/issues/11-5musica.php


You all might find this book interesting. If I remember correctly it does have sections about the huguenot craftsmens, and of course included alot of other Reformed trads.

Seeing Beyond the Word. Visual Arts and the Calvinist Tradition.
(Ed.) by Paul Corby Finney

I've only skimmed through in a bookstore; it is always out of my price range. But it looks interesting.
Thanks very much for these excellent tips! :up:
 

VirginiaHuguenot

Puritanboard Librarian
Originally posted by VirginiaHuguenot
Originally posted by VirginiaHuguenot
Has anybody ever seen Les Huguenots?
Has anyone ever read La Reine Margot (Queen Margot) (1845) by Alexandre Dumas or seen the 1994 movie?

Or seen the BBC Doctor Who serial on The Massacre of St. Bartholomew's Eve?
Any takers? :candle:

Also, I have heard about a pre-1867 painting by Edwin D. White is said to reside at Mt. Holyoke College in South Hadley, Massachusetts called Landing of the Huguenots at the Mouth of the St. Johns River in 1564. I have been unable to find this painting online and have no plans to visit Mt. Holyoke. Has anyone ever heard of or seen this painting?

[Edited on 9-14-2005 by VirginiaHuguenot]
 

Plimoth Thom

Puritan Board Freshman
I've seen the film Queen Margot. Besides the ubiquitous sex and nudity one would expect in a French film, its a fairly good movie about a very interesting period in history.
 

VirginiaHuguenot

Puritanboard Librarian
Originally posted by Plimoth Thom
I've seen the film Queen Margot. Besides the ubiquitous sex and nudity one would expect in a French film, its a fairly good movie about a very interesting period in history.
Oh bummer -- with Isabelle Adjani I might have expected. Too bad. Movies with that subject matter are rare.
 

LadyCalvinist

Puritan Board Junior
Andrew, I used to be a big Dr. Who fan. That story was made in the 1960's and unfortunately in the 1970's the BCC cleaned house and wiped out a number of Dr. who episodes ( the original story was 4 25 minute episodes), none of which currently exist.

However, I do have the novelization of the book, and there is also an audio version (taken directly from the TV) of the story which is available from Amazon I believe.
Outpost Gallifrey has all things Dr. Who related.

In 1960's the show was not what I would call anti-religious, indeed there are a few positive references to religion, but since the 1970's the show has become quite athiestic. A pity as I used to enjoy it.
 
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