Is there a "Reformed" eschatology?

Don Kistler

Puritan Board Sophomore
Is there an eschatology that is accepted by most "Reformed" folks? I know a few of the English Puritans were historic pre-mil. Iain Murray wrote "The Puritan Hope" showing that many Puritans were post-mil. Many Reformed Baptists today are a-mil. I think most reject the preterist view. But is there one that you could point to and say, "That's the Reformed view of eschatology?"

If this is not the right forum for this, feel free to put it where it belongs.
 

Reformed Covenanter

Puritanboard Commissioner
From what I have read, the amillennial, premillennial, and postmillennial views all have a place within the Reformed tradition, though certain extreme variants of each perspective may be beyond the pale.
 

W.C. Dean

Puritan Board Freshman
From what I have observed among Reformed circles, amillennial views seem to be the most common among pastors and other teachers. Partial-preterist Postmillenial views are relatively common, and historic premillennial and historicist postmillenial views seem to be the rarity. You are probably more likely to find historicist postmillenials in denominations that subscribe to the original Westminster Confession, like the Presbyterian Reformed Church, or the Free Church of Scotland (Continuing). I hope this is helpful.
 

RWD

Puritan Board Sophomore
From what I have read, the amillennial, premillennial, and postmillennial views all have a place within the Reformed tradition, though certain extreme variants of each perspective may be beyond the pale.
The Westminster standards speaks of only one “general resurrection” followed by the judgment. Doesn’t historical premillennialism require two resurrections if not also two judgements?
 

TylerRay

Puritan Board Graduate
Is there an eschatology that is accepted by most "Reformed" folks? I know a few of the English Puritans were historic pre-mil. Iain Murray wrote "The Puritan Hope" showing that many Puritans were post-mil. Many Reformed Baptists today are a-mil. I think most reject the preterist view. But is there one that you could point to and say, "That's the Reformed view of eschatology?"

If this is not the right forum for this, feel free to put it where it belongs.
Historicism, especially of the postmillennial type (though there were premillennial historicists, such as Goodwin), was the dominant view of Revelation until the 1800s. In the 1800s, things started shifting toward idealism and futurism. In the 1900s, idealism became dominant in Reformed circles. Preterism has always been a fringe view, and was most popular among the Reconstructionists of the late 1900s.
 

W.C. Dean

Puritan Board Freshman
The Westminster standards speaks of only one “general resurrection” followed by the judgment. Doesn’t historical premillennialism require two resurrections if not also two judgements?
Usually Reformed Premillenials have an edited version of the WCF. The American Presbyterian Church and Bible Presbyterian Church do this.
 

Unique Name

Puritan Board Freshman
Usually Reformed Premillenials have an edited version of the WCF. The American Presbyterian Church and Bible Presbyterian Church do this.
Do you know if the Reformation Study Bible by Editor RC Sproul contain altered or original versions of the WCF and catechisms?
 

Reformed Covenanter

Puritanboard Commissioner
The Westminster standards speaks of only one “general resurrection” followed by the judgment. Doesn’t historical premillennialism require two resurrections if not also two judgements?
The question to ask there is were the statements in chapters 32 and 33 meant to exclude the type of premillennialism held by the likes of Thomas Goodwin et al? I have heard it claimed that William Twisse was premillennial. May anyone confirm whether or not this assertion is accurate?
 

RWD

Puritan Board Sophomore
The question to ask there is were the statements in chapters 32 and 33 meant to exclude the type of premillennialism held by the likes of Thomas Goodwin et al? I have heard it claimed that William Twisse was premillennial. May anyone confirm whether or not this assertion is accurate?
I was talking more in terms of the catechism that identifies one general resurrection and judgment.
 

BayouHuguenot

Puritanboard Amanuensis
I have heard it claimed that William Twisse was premillennial.
Yes. He either wrote a preface to some other premil work, or wrote a premil tract himself. The tricky thing is that it isn't "historic" premil like we would see today, nor is it Dispensational.

You might hear people say that person x in the church was historic premil. That is false. They would have been historicist premil (though not necesssarily seeing the pope as antichrist). In other words, they saw history unfolding in revelation, and then tacking on premil conclusions.
 

W.C. Dean

Puritan Board Freshman
Do you know if the Reformation Study Bible by Editor RC Sproul contain altered or original versions of the WCF and catechisms?
Perhaps someone here that owns one can assist you. I do not own a copy of the RSB, but Ligonier's website does not specify what creeds are found therein. I believe Dr. Sproul held to one of the revisions of the WCF, and then he still had pretty major exceptions.

The Reformation Heritage Study Bible contains the 1647, unedited WCF, Catechisms, and the Three Forms of Unity, along with the ancient creeds.
 

Stephen L Smith

Moderator
Staff member
Article 37 of the Belgic Confession is the official eschatology of Reformed churches. You don't even need a chart to understand it.
It goes nicely with chapter 32 and 33 of the Westminster Confession. One could say that the statements of both confessions constitute a true Reformed eschatology.
 

Stephen L Smith

Moderator
Staff member
From what I have read, the amillennial, premillennial, and postmillennial views all have a place within the Reformed tradition, though certain extreme variants of each perspective may be beyond the pale.
True, but a dispensational premillennial view is not acceptable within the bounds of Reformed orthodoxy.
 

Jerusalem Blade

Puritan Board Post-Graduate
From what I have seen in Reformed and Presbyterian churches, and in Calvinistic Baptist churches, the Amillennial view is the most widely taught and accepted — though what I have seen is admittedly limited.
 
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