Johann Heinrich Alsted

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VirginiaHuguenot

Puritanboard Librarian
Johann Heinrich Alsted, German Reformed theologian (1588 -- November 8, 1638), was the author of a famous series of compendiums of general knowledge, including the first complete modern Bible dictionary, and a highly-regarded Encyclopedia. He also represented the Church of Nassau at the Synod of Dordt, and served as Professor of Philosophy and Divinity at Herborn.

The first successful attempt to compile a dictionary of the Bible was made by the polyhistor and Protestant theologian Johann Heinrich Alsted (1588-1638), who wrote a universal encyclopedia and a "Triumphus Bibliorum Sacrorum seu Encyclopædia Biblica," Frankfort, 1625. -- Source

More biographical information can be found here.
 

R. Scott Clark

Puritan Board Senior
Howard Hotson has written a brilliant book on Alsted.

rsc


Originally posted by VirginiaHuguenot
Johann Heinrich Alsted, German Reformed theologian (1588 -- November 8, 1638), was the author of a famous series of compendiums of general knowledge, including the first complete modern Bible dictionary, and a highly-regarded Encyclopedia. He also represented the Church of Nassau at the Synod of Dordt, and served as Professor of Philosophy and Divinity at Herborn.

The first successful attempt to compile a dictionary of the Bible was made by the polyhistor and Protestant theologian Johann Heinrich Alsted (1588-1638), who wrote a universal encyclopedia and a "Triumphus Bibliorum Sacrorum seu Encyclopædia Biblica," Frankfort, 1625. -- Source

More biographical information can be found here.
 

Ivan

Pastor
Originally posted by VirginiaHuguenot
He also represented the Church of Nassau at the Synod of Dordt, and served as Professor of Philosophy and Divinity at Herborn.

Nassau? Please excuse my ignorance.
 

NaphtaliPress

Administrator
Staff member
George Gillespie quotes Alsted several times in his Dispute Against the English Popish Ceremonies, as follows:
Alsted, Johann, German Reformed divine (1588-1638)
Thesaurus Chronologiæ (Herborn, 1624) -- 49, 65, 76
Theologia casuum (Hanover, Germany, 1621) -- 12, 15, 16, 25, 69, 375-376, 450
Page references are to the 1993 Naphtali Press edition of EPC. The full Bibliograpy to EPC is here:
http://www.naphtali.com/GGBooks.htm
 

VirginiaHuguenot

Puritanboard Librarian
Originally posted by Ivan
Originally posted by VirginiaHuguenot
He also represented the Church of Nassau at the Synod of Dordt, and served as Professor of Philosophy and Divinity at Herborn.

Nassau? Please excuse my ignorance.

Nassau is a German city in the ancient region (during the Holy Roman Empire) of Nassau. For other meanings of and connections to Nassau see here. Nassau, Germany is the origin of the name Nassau which is also the capital of the Bahamas and a county in New York state among other places. For more information on the ruling dynasty known as the House of Nassau see here. For a list of other foreign representative at the Synod of Dordt see here.
 

Ivan

Pastor
Originally posted by VirginiaHuguenot
Originally posted by Ivan
Originally posted by VirginiaHuguenot
He also represented the Church of Nassau at the Synod of Dordt, and served as Professor of Philosophy and Divinity at Herborn.

Nassau? Please excuse my ignorance.

Nassau is a German city in the ancient region (during the Holy Roman Empire) of Nassau. For other meanings of and connections to Nassau see here. Nassau, Germany is the origin of the name Nassau which is also the capital of the Bahamas and a county in New York state among other places. For more information on the ruling dynasty known as the House of Nassau see here. For a list of other foreign representative at the Synod of Dordt see here.

Thank you, Andrew. Awesome!

I found this last sentence interesting in the list of foreign representatives of the Synod of Dort : "From France: None because the French government prohibited their attendance. A set of empty chairs was set up in the assembly in honor of the absent French Huguenots".
 

VirginiaHuguenot

Puritanboard Librarian
Originally posted by Ivan
Thank you, Andrew. Awesome!

You're welcome, Ivan!

I found this last sentence interesting in the list of foreign representatives of the Synod of Dort : "From France: None because the French government prohibited their attendance. A set of empty chairs was set up in the assembly in honor of the absent French Huguenots".

Yes, it was a powerfully symbolic and much appreciated gesture which showed the solidarity this ecumenical synod had with the persecuted Huguenots.

Schaff says:

The national Synod of France elected four delegates"”among them the celebrated theologians Chamier and Du Moulin"”but the King forbade them to leave the country.

and

The canons of Dort were fully [e]ndorsed by the Reformed Church in France, and made binding upon the ministers at the Twenty-third National Synod at Alais, Oct. 1, 1620, and again at the Twenty-fourth Synod at Charenton, Sept., 1623.
 
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