John Calvin on Paul’s use of pagan sources

Reformed Covenanter

Puritanboard Commissioner
... Certain of your poets. He citeth half a verse out of Aratus, not so much for authority’s sake, as that he may make the men of Athens ashamed; for such sayings of the poets came from no other fountain save only from nature and common reason. Neither is it any marvel if Paul, who spake unto men who were infidels and ignorant of true godliness, do use the testimony of a poet, wherein was extant a confession of that knowledge which is naturally engraven in men’s minds.

The Papists take another course. For they so lean to the testimonies of men, that they set them against the oracles of God; and they do not only make Jerome, or Ambrose and the residue of the holy fathers, masters of faith, but they will no less tie us to the stinking [vile] answers of their Popes than if God himself should speak. Yea, that which more, they have not been afraid to give so great authority to Aristotle that the apostles and prophets were silent in their schools rather than he. ...

For more, see John Calvin on Paul’s use of pagan sources.
 
Top