John Chrysostom on godly fear

Reformed Covenanter

Puritanboard Commissioner
... And not only this advantage do we gain from fear, but also another which is far greater. For not only, indeed, does it expel our evil passions, but it also introduces every kind of virtue with great facility. Where fear exists, there is zeal in alms-giving, and intensity of prayer, and tears warm and frequent, and groans fraught with compunction. For nothing so swallows up sin, and makes virtue to increase and flourish, as a perpetual state of dread. Therefore it is impossible for him who does not live in fear to act aright; as, on the other hand, it is impossible that the man who lives in fear can go wrong. ...

For more, see John Chrysostom on godly fear.
 

Wretched Man

Puritan Board Freshman
... And not only this advantage do we gain from fear, but also another which is far greater. For not only, indeed, does it expel our evil passions, but it also introduces every kind of virtue with great facility. Where fear exists, there is zeal in alms-giving, and intensity of prayer, and tears warm and frequent, and groans fraught with compunction. For nothing so swallows up sin, and makes virtue to increase and flourish, as a perpetual state of dread. Therefore it is impossible for him who does not live in fear to act aright; as, on the other hand, it is impossible that the man who lives in fear can go wrong. ...

For more, see John Chrysostom on godly fear.
So many Christians (or at least self acclaimed) resist the notion of Godly fear. (“By fear, the Bible really means in awe or reverence of...”) I really worry about those people.
 

DTK

Puritan Board Junior
This citation reminded me of another of his...

Chrysostom (349-407): So then I fear not an enemy’s plots: one thing only do I fear, which is sin. If no one convicts me of sin, then let the whole world make war upon me. For this kind of war only renders me more prosperous. NPNF1: Vol. IX, Two Homilies on Eutropius, Homily 2, §4, p. 254.
Greek text: Οὐ δέδοικα τοίνυν ἐπιβουλήν· ἓν δέδοικα μόνον, ἁμαρτίαν. Μὴ μέ τις ἐλέγξῃ ἁμαρτάνοντα, καὶ ἡ οἰκουμένη πᾶσα πολεμείτω μοι. Ὁ γὰρ πόλεμος οὗτος λαμπρότερόν με ἐργάζεται. Homilia de Capto Eutropio et de divitiarum vanitate, §4, PG 52:399.
 

PezLad

Puritan Board Freshman
"For nothing so swallows up sin, and makes virtue to increase and flourish, as a perpetual state of dread. " This phrase is flatly false. 1 John 4:18 There is no fear in love; but perfect love casts out fear, because fear involves torment. But he who fears has not been made perfect in love. As Christians we first have a slavish fear of the Fathers wrath which in sanctification of our spirit is transformed into a filial fear. The maturing of Christian in love is putting aside of all slavish fears, fear of the Fathers wrath and alienation, and instead with his countenance of holiness and goodness, a filial fear of a holy, good and just Father. To be in love with the Fathers wrath, to want be in perpetual state of dread, is to be in the flesh. One can be in a perpetual state of awe and reverence by being reconciled to Christ, and beholding the Father in Christ, in union and communion with Him. The experience of slavish fears, that is the just wrath of God against our sin drives us unto Christ the King, wherein we come unto the Father and receive a filial fear, since slavish fears are turned away. This is a good thing to know the wrath of the Father unto our sin insofar as it leads to holiness and filial fear, without which it is of no value. If a brother in Christ rebukes me according to Gods will and it produces slavish fear, this is good, insofar as through communion with Christ and his blood, my iniquity is removed, righteousness imparted and filial fear raised.
 
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