John Davenport on turning from the religious observance of Christmas

Reformed Covenanter

Puritanboard Commissioner
Lastly, Turn from your evil ways to God, and the Rules of his Word. This I might apply to sundry particulars; but at present I shall speak only to one Abuse of this season of the Year, which is called CHRISTMAS: which is to be witnessed against …

If upon a Religious Account; None can sanctify Time to make a day holy to the Lord, but the sanctifying Spirit, in and by some Word of God in Scripture. The Feasts of Purim were Civil Festivals, called Good days of feasting, and sending gifts one to another, not Holy times, separated from common uses to holy.

Now we nowhere find warrant in Scripture for setting apart the day of Christ’s Nativity from common use, to religious holy use: Indeed the day of his Resurrection, the first day of the week, that is by Christ sanctified to be the Christians Christian Sabbath: for that was the beginning of Christ’s Exaltation, but the day of his Birth, was the beginning of his Humiliation and Abasement; so that there is not a parity of reason between them. ...

For the reference, see John Davenport on turning from the religious observance of Christmas.
 

Mrs. B-N

Puritan Board Freshman
"Speaking on the Nativity of Christ, Calvin drew his audience to consider the transformative joy of festival, declaring that it was a time for celebration in this world in preparation for the next. “Cursed then are all enjoyments, all honors, all things desirable, until we feel that God received us in mercy. Being thus reconciled with him we can enjoy ourselves, not merely with an earthly joy, but especially with that joy that is promised to us in the Holy Spirit, in order that we may seek it in him.”


This article quoted above has some interesting thoughts on Calvin's take on Christmas. I personally do not agree with Davenport and I think we do more harm than good, denying Christmas in our culture.
 

NaphtaliPress

Administrator
Staff member
"Speaking on the Nativity of Christ, Calvin drew his audience to consider the transformative joy of festival, declaring that it was a time for celebration in this world in preparation for the next. “Cursed then are all enjoyments, all honors, all things desirable, until we feel that God received us in mercy. Being thus reconciled with him we can enjoy ourselves, not merely with an earthly joy, but especially with that joy that is promised to us in the Holy Spirit, in order that we may seek it in him.”


This article quoted above has some interesting thoughts on Calvin's take on Christmas. I personally do not agree with Davenport and I think we do more harm than good, denying Christmas in our culture.
Welcome to the PB. Please fix your signature block so folks know how to address you; see the link at the bottom of the page under useful links. This article you linked misrepresents Calvin. Calvin didn't believe there were "two most holy days" in the year. He was fine with preaching a Nativity and resurrection sermon, but had no use for the old pretended holy days. He in fact with Farel got rid of all of them when they first got started in Geneva except for the Lord's day. Geneva owed Bern for saving it's bacon and Bern insisted the Geneva worship like they did and re-institute 5 holy days. That and other issues were the cause of Calvin and Farel's banishment. When Geneva begged Calvin to return a few years later after things had fallen into anarchy, he agreed and agreed to abide by the imposition but then steadily taught and worked to reduce the 5 days and eventually in 1550 the city did them away except for the topical sermons, which interestingly was the original compromise Calvin and Farel offered that was rejected and so the were banished. He also always advised to get rid of the old pretended holy days and if a church successfully did jettison them, never to return to them.
 
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