Latin Per Diem - Dr. David Noe

RPEphesian

Puritan Board Junior
For those who are interested in studying Latin, here is a resource which will help in study.

Latin Per Diem

The channel is run by Dr. David Noe, an elder at Reformation OPC in Grand Rapids, MI, licentiate in the presbytery of Michigan and Ontario, Dept. Chair of Philosophy at Calvin University, professor of Classics, History, and Philosophy. He has also translated at least two of the treatises of the republished works of William Perkins in Volume 6.

All that to say, this isn't run by an amateur YouTuber.

Dr. Noe's own claim is that if you study these videos you'll have everything you need to know to be proficient in Latin. His own recommendation is to watch one video a day with a notebook, take notes on what you read, review it, and you'll be on your way to Latin proficiency.

This is probably better suited to those who have already mastered basic grammatical concepts of Latin, or have attained a proficient level of Greek, since much of it will assume you understand the foundations. It wouldn't make for a "Latin 101" course, but will bring you deeper into Latin by direct study and analysis of classic texts.

A complementary resource in which Dr. Noe participates is the Ad Navseum podcast, featuring discussions on literature and events of the ancient Western world. No study of language should be disjoined from the study of its native speakers and writers.

May be a good endeavor, as @Travis Fentiman tells us in this thread that much of the Reformed gold is still locked up in Latin.

@Regi Addictissimus is invited for further comments on these resources.
 

Taylor

Puritan Board Senior
It’s so weird that you mention this. I just met this gentleman last night. I’m taking a ministerial training course with him through the OPC.
 

Gwallard

Puritan Board Freshman
I know this channel! I have been subscribed for something like 7 years. Wonderful guy, and wonderful resource, but yes, this is definitely for those who have mastered the basics. That was me at one time, perhaps I will be once again, but it's very hard for me to follow these days.
 

Andrew35

Puritan Board Sophomore
For those who are interested in studying Latin, here is a resource which will help in study.

Latin Per Diem

The channel is run by Dr. David Noe, an elder at Reformation OPC in Grand Rapids, MI, licentiate in the presbytery of Michigan and Ontario, Dept. Chair of Philosophy at Calvin University, professor of Classics, History, and Philosophy. He has also translated at least two of the treatises of the republished works of William Perkins in Volume 6.

All that to say, this isn't run by an amateur YouTuber.

Dr. Noe's own claim is that if you study these videos you'll have everything you need to know to be proficient in Latin. His own recommendation is to watch one video a day with a notebook, take notes on what you read, review it, and you'll be on your way to Latin proficiency.

This is probably better suited to those who have already mastered basic grammatical concepts of Latin, or have attained a proficient level of Greek, since much of it will assume you understand the foundations. It wouldn't make for a "Latin 101" course, but will bring you deeper into Latin by direct study and analysis of classic texts.

A complementary resource in which Dr. Noe participates is the Ad Navseum podcast, featuring discussions on literature and events of the ancient Western world. No study of language should be disjoined from the study of its native speakers and writers.

May be a good endeavor, as @Travis Fentiman tells us in this thread that much of the Reformed gold is still locked up in Latin.

@Regi Addictissimus is invited for further comments on these resources.
I love the Ad Navseum podcast! Not just informative, but a very well-run podcast -- and that's not easy to do. I've abandoned podcasts before, even though they have good content, because they're so poorly executed. (I stopped downloading the History of Literature podcast because of the host's annoying tendency to explode in giggles at bizarrely inappropriate times.)

Highly recommended! Make sure to have a listen as you have the chance!
 

Regi Addictissimus

Completely sold out to the King
I love the Ad Navseum podcast! Not just informative, but a very well-run podcast -- and that's not easy to do. I've abandoned podcasts before, even though they have good content, because they're so poorly executed. (I stopped downloading the History of Literature podcast because of the host's annoying tendency to explode in giggles at bizarrely inappropriate times.)

Highly recommended! Make sure to have a listen as you have the chance!
Glad to hear you enjoy it. I just passed this along to him.
 

Regi Addictissimus

Completely sold out to the King
I will add that Dr. Noe is one of the most disciplined and hardworking people that I have ever known. Besides teaching and translation work, he labors tirelessly to guard our flock against error in doctrine and worship. It is humbling to call this man a brother.

Time spent on any resource that David publishes is never time wasted. You will be challenged and built up.

Side note: My wife did the re-branding for Latin Per Diem.
 

RPEphesian

Puritan Board Junior
I love the Ad Navseum podcast! Not just informative, but a very well-run podcast -- and that's not easy to do. I've abandoned podcasts before, even though they have good content, because they're so poorly executed. (I stopped downloading the History of Literature podcast because of the host's annoying tendency to explode in giggles at bizarrely inappropriate times.)

Highly recommended! Make sure to have a listen as you have the chance!

I love that they nicknamed the studio as "The Vomitorium."

@Regi Addictissimus Aside from Perkins on the end of the world, I had only read the memory-related treatises of volume six in the work of William Perkins, which were done by Dr. Noe. I could see why a man educated in the classics and philosophy would alone be qualified to translate such a work. That's an obscure subject which requires not only Latin, but knowledge of philosophy, history, literature, and the Renaissance. I listened to the podcast of Ad Navseum on memory methods, which rather confirms the sentiment that translation should never be done without some good working knowledge of the culture that produced the original work. He seemed to understand that odd subject so well.

I've said it before, but kudos to him on the translating work. The Alexander Dickson quotes translated into English are bumbly, awkward and painful (not the translator's fault!). I can't imagine his Latin.
 
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