Let us behold His glory! - Christology thread

Status
Not open for further replies.

RPEphesian

Puritan Board Junior
Song of Solomon 5:2-6
I sleep, but my heart waketh:
It is the voice of my beloved that knocketh, saying,
Open to me, my sister, my love, my dove, my undefiled:
For my head is filled with dew,
And my locks with the drops of the night.
I have put off my coat; how shall I put it on?
I have washed my feet; how shall I defile them?
My beloved put in his hand by the hole of the door,
And my bowels were moved for him.
I rose up to open to my beloved;
And my hands dropped with myrrh,
And my fingers with sweet smelling myrrh,
Upon the handles of the lock.
I opened to my beloved;
But my beloved had withdrawn himself, and was gone:
My soul failed when he spake:
I sought him, but I could not find him;
I called him, but he gave me no answer.


We believe in one God and three persons. Like human persons, each divine person loves and seeks out company--our company. Each has emotions as we do, except worlds more, and different in nature. And in a special way, Christ seeks us because we are united to Him.

And like human persons, they can be grieved and offended. So Christ comes with love and affection for His bride, seeking fellowship, having a million reasons in His heart why He wants her company. Perhaps a call to prayer or more prayer, perhaps He wanted to grant further meditations, or perhaps He had looked forward to meeting her in the public worship; but she never answered these calls, she was absent without cause, or she was there in body but distant in spirit, and He could tell. The Beloved is put off, and does sometimes back off like one who has been scorned.

What scorning is like one who says she is too busy for the one that paid her death sentence, and by marriage made her queen and co-heir of all things?

And what love like the Savior who after this is willing to be found again?

And still call her undefiled?
 

Reformed Covenanter

Cancelled Commissioner
The king under whom Isaiah has hitherto prophesied is dead (v. 1), and, in all likelihood, he is cast down by that event. In this frame he repairs to "the temple" (v. 1), that he may pour out his laden soul, and takes his place (v. 6) hard by "the altar." But the temple is Christ — the altar Christ — the blood Christ — the very ashes are Christ; and as Christ thus meets his view, in all his sufferings and in all his love, peace would visit the afflicted saint again. O there is no relief for an anxious soul, no balm for a wounded soul, no light for a sad and gloomy soul, but Jesus!

John James Bonar, ‘Isaiah’s Vision of Christ’s Glory’ in The Free Church Pulpit; Consisting of Discourses by the Most Eminent divines of the Free Church of Scotland. Vol. I. (New York: Robert Carter, 1848), p. 421.
 

RPEphesian

Puritan Board Junior
The king under whom Isaiah has hitherto prophesied is dead (v. 1), and, in all likelihood, he is cast down by that event. In this frame he repairs to "the temple" (v. 1), that he may pour out his laden soul, and takes his place (v. 6) hard by "the altar." But the temple is Christ — the altar Christ — the blood Christ — the very ashes are Christ; and as Christ thus meets his view, in all his sufferings and in all his love, peace would visit the afflicted saint again. O there is no relief for an anxious soul, no balm for a wounded soul, no light for a sad and gloomy soul, but Jesus!

John James Bonar, ‘Isaiah’s Vision of Christ’s Glory’ in The Free Church Pulpit; Consisting of Discourses by the Most Eminent divines of the Free Church of Scotland. Vol. I. (New York: Robert Carter, 1848), p. 421.

Thank the Lord for our difficulties which force us to take no other refuge or peace anywhere except in Him, though the difficulties or chastisements be hard when we go through them. This must be what is meant by discipline's peaceable fruit of righteousness--the knowledge of the Savior who brings all peace, above all with God.
 

RPEphesian

Puritan Board Junior
We all see through a glass darkly. I still feel at times when looking at Christ like a man who is missing His glasses. Some of the glory, a sense of His beauty, and I steadily see more, but sometimes my vision is blurry.

As an example, I am still impacted by Jesus films growing up. They never failed to leave an impression that Jesus is not all that interesting. Some of my sanctification is just getting past those impressions. They show Him as a man, but not as God. As humbled and veiled, but not exalted. So important to guard against any visual images of His person whatsoever! Christ is no longer in humiliation, but in glory. We must be aware of anything which, if He comes knocking like in SoS 5, we are too uninterested to get up from our beds and go meet Him.

Sometimes we simply don't believe what we read. For example, we don't draw near expecting what the Shulamite woman did because it just seems out of bounds, too good for us. Perhaps we feel the same way about beholding His glory according to His prayer in John 17, or being partakers of the divine nature in 2 Peter 1.

Sometimes we're not willing to be humbled for our sins, that we may better see His grace.

Sometimes, that little voice that says, "Did God really say..."

Sometimes we are still trying to fashion one or all three persons according to our own imagination, which molds him into the bounds of our own imagination, and detracts from His incomprehensibility, which detracts His glory, which makes Him small in our eyes.

Sometimes we are just slow of heart to believe all that Christ tells us about Himself.

Sometimes we do not entertain the Spirit, so that we may be taught.

Sometimes the implications of who He is has staggering implications to us. It says something about our sins, our self-willedness, and calls us to deny ourselves. His person brings to light the true demand of holiness, and like Peter with the hard saying of Christ in Matthew 16 we reject what He has told us, because we don't savour of God's way of thinking, but man's. Or the other disciples saying, "This is a hard saying. Who can bear it?" We are not beyond having prejudice against Christ.

Can anyone share an experience, an insight, a passage, where you felt as though before you saw Christ so indistinctly, but upon a better understanding it's as though the glasses had come on and you saw much more distinctly, and He became much more real to you? Or perhaps, even the Father or the Spirit? What is it that you did not understand, or you misunderstood, or where you needed refinement? How did you come to see the truth? What did it do to your communion with Christ? How did it change?
 
Last edited:

Reformed Covenanter

Cancelled Commissioner
There is none who can describe the heart of man like him who made that heart. There is none whose instructions so much merit our regard, as his who came into the world to teach us and to shed his blood for our redemption. He has a perfect knowledge of our ease, and the most disinterested regard to our welfare.

James Richards, ‘The Danger and Folly of Indulging a Covetous Temper’ in The New-Jersey Preacher: or, Sermons on Plain & Practical Subjects. By some of the Ministers of the Gospel, Residing in the State of New-Jersey. Vol. I. (New Brunswick NJ: Charles D. Green, 1813), p. 198.
 

RPEphesian

Puritan Board Junior
There is none who can describe the heart of man like him who made that heart. There is none whose instructions so much merit our regard, as his who came into the world to teach us and to shed his blood for our redemption. He has a perfect knowledge of our ease, and the most disinterested regard to our welfare.

James Richards, ‘The Danger and Folly of Indulging a Covetous Temper’ in The New-Jersey Preacher: or, Sermons on Plain & Practical Subjects. By some of the Ministers of the Gospel, Residing in the State of New-Jersey. Vol. I. (New Brunswick NJ: Charles D. Green, 1813), p. 198.

I'm guessing this quote is more extended to the application of Christ on the subject of covetousness, but it does trigger some other thoughts.

Isaiah 52:13
Behold, my servant shall deal prudently,
He shall be exalted and extolled, and be very high.

My wife and I read this passage last night. This passage, in conjunction with your quote, runs with a running interest of mine lately--the theme of wisdom.

It's worth meditating on just what it meant for Christ to be prudent and wise.

A perfect knowledge of the Law of God, all its implications, Spirit-given and hard-studied acquaintance with the Scriptures, how to apply it in all situations including some high-stakes scenarios where men tried to trap him. He had to be righteous and blameless in both the sight of both God and man. God, whose holy eye would spot even the least imperfection; and man, who is more than happy to call out sin where it only appears so, even if there is none.

And as your quote says, and as John 2 says, He knew what was in a man, and knew what it was to be as wise as a serpent, gentle as a dove. And He had to ensure that when He came to trial, there would not even be grounds of even a possibility of having sinned, so it'd be clear that He was unjustly condemned.

And then, to be so wise in all respects as to be a perfect and sufficient Prophet, Priest, and King. Any of the three for any man required great wisdom and understanding. To do all three is above any other man. And I think I see all three offices in that quote.

His greatness is unsearchable, Psalm 145:3.
 

RPEphesian

Puritan Board Junior
Charles Bridges on Proverbs, which I just read, which coincides with the last post. from faculty.gordon.edu (modified for readability).

Bridges takes the position that wisdom in Ch. 8 is without any doubt the Lord Jesus Christ. That's my position too.

Behold, the King in His moral beauty!

12. I wisdom dwell with prudence, and find out knowledge of witty in ventions.

How adorable is the Being here before us! His glorious perfections, each dwelling with the other in such harmonious combination! All the witty inventions of science are ultimately traceable to this heavenly source. (Exod. xxxi. 3–6; xxxv. 30-35. 1 Chron. xxviii. 19. Isa. xxviii. 24–29.) But his great mind was soaring far beyond. The vast discovery of man's salvation was now before his eyes (Verses 22–31) found out, not by laborious investigation, but by the intuition of the Infinite Godhead. Here is his most splendid display of wisdom (Eph. iii. 10) dwelling with prudencewisdom contriving for the highest end prudence directing the most effective means. The same perfect combination controls all his arrangements, both as "the Head of the Church" (Col. i. 18), and "the Head over all things to his Church " (Eph. i. 22), for her present good, and his eternal glory. ‘And what’ owe we individually, to "the riches of his grace, wherein," by the removal of insuperable difficulties, and the communication of suitable grace," he hath abounded towards us in all wisdom and prudence!"

Prudence is commonly thought to be only a moral quality. Here we see it to be an attribute of Deity. The humanity of our beloved Lord was filled with this perfection. (Isa. xi. 2.) With what Divine acuteness of wisdom did he find out the knowledge of the inventions of his enemies, and put them to shame! (Matt. ix. 4-8; xxii. 15-46.) And how did this combination of prudence restrain him from hasty confidence (John, ii. 23, 24), remove him from premature danger (Matt. xii. 14-16. John, vi. 15), and preserve him from giving needless offence! (Matt. xvii. 27.) Praised be our God for such "treasures of wisdom," hid in our glorious Head," ready for distribution for every emergency of his people's need! (Col. i. 19; ii. 3.)
 
Status
Not open for further replies.
Top