Logic books.

Status
Not open for further replies.

Brian Bosse

"The Brain"
Julio,

I have not heard of the book recommended by Tim. A pretty comprehensive introduction to logic is the mainstay Introduction to Logic by Copi. Don't worry about buying the latest edition - too expensive. You should be able to find a 10th edition for somewhere between $20 and $30.

Now, in terms of argumentation and sound reasoning I recommend the following:

(1) With Good Reason by S. Morris Engel
(2) A Rulebook for Arguments by Anthony Weston

For a very good introduction to the logic of the syllogism look to Martin Cothran's Traditional Logic both books 1 and 2.

Copi's book will touch on everything mentioned above.

Sincerely,

Brian
 

glorifyinggodinwv

Puritan Board Sophomore
Julio,

I second Brian's recommendation for Copi. His introduction was pretty much the standard for logic classes when I was a philosophy major back in the early 90s. You can find a used older edition on Amazon at a very reasonable price.

Chris
 

ReformedChapin

Puritan Board Freshman
Julio,

I second Brian's recommendation for Copi. His introduction was pretty much the standard for logic classes when I was a philosophy major back in the early 90s. You can find a used older edition on Amazon at a very reasonable price.

Chris
It does include all the basics of logic such as the Law of Non-Contradiction, Law of Casuality, Syllogisms, Inductive and Deductive logic ect right ?
 

Brian Bosse

"The Brain"
Yup! It is pretty comprehensive. Although, the law of causality is really not a logical law, and as such you will not find much in Copi on it. Also, induction may be treated, but Copi's book is mainly concered with deduction - necessary inference. However, he does have a good section on informal fallacies.
 

glorifyinggodinwv

Puritan Board Sophomore
Julio,

It has been a long time since I read Copi, but I think the standard Introduction to Logic covers all the things you mention. Someone who has read Copi more recently may be able to give a more informed response.

Chris
 

Craig

Puritan Board Senior
I've got an old edition of Copi's introduction to logic. It is very readable. Much more readable than Gordon Clark's book on Logic...that one, while I'm sure technically great, is not a good primer.

I got my old edition of Copi for under $10 from alibris.com
 

jwithnell

Moderator
Staff member
I didn't realize how far-reaching Copi was (or is). I used that logic book in college back in the early 1980s and bought it again a few years ago.
 

kalawine

Puritan Board Junior
Logic by Gordon Clark

also a an 18-part lecture series on logic:
Introduction to Logic by John Robbins

The Fallacy Detective
Did anyone read Clarks book? What did you like about it?
Clark's book is written as a text book for students. He is very thorough and "begins at the beginning" with logic. He teaches the laws of logic as well as the diffences between formal and informal logic. One thing I enjoyed about the book is Clark's use of the Euler Diagrams.
 

Brian Bosse

"The Brain"
Hello Gents,

I own Clark's book and do not recommend it for Julio's purposes. Clark is not as precise as one would like, and he uses unorthodox symbols in his presentation. I agree that his use of Euler's diagrams is very good. Yet, stay with Copi.

As far as the Bluedorn's books go (The Fallacy Detective and The Thinking Tool Box), they are very good, and are geared to the homeschool audience.

Sincerely,

Brian
 

Igor

Puritan Board Freshman
I have not heard of the book recommended by Tim. A pretty comprehensive introduction to logic is the mainstay Introduction to Logic by Copi. Don't worry about buying the latest edition - too expensive. You should be able to find a 10th edition for somewhere between $20 and $30.
Seems like you can get the latest edition cheaper: ISBN 0136141390 - AbeBooks
BTW, are there any books on the subject written from the theistic perspective?
 
Last edited:

Brian Withnell

Puritan Board Junior
What is amazing to me is that so many have written entire books on what is a single chapter of most discrete math books. (Well, two chapters if you include proof by mathematical induction.) Give me a book on Boolean Algebra, and the rest is application.
 

ReformedChapin

Puritan Board Freshman
I have not heard of the book recommended by Tim. A pretty comprehensive introduction to logic is the mainstay Introduction to Logic by Copi. Don't worry about buying the latest edition - too expensive. You should be able to find a 10th edition for somewhere between $20 and $30.
Seems like you can get the latest edition cheaper: ISBN 0136141390 - AbeBooks
BTW, are there any books on the subject written from the theistic perspective?
I was recommended Logic, or the Right Use of Reason By Isaac Watts which is written from a Christian perspective. I thought that was what people were going to recommend here but I guess not.

Logic, or the Right Use of Reason - By: Isaac Watts - Christianbook.com
 

Igor

Puritan Board Freshman
I was recommended Logic, or the Right Use of Reason By Isaac Watts which is written from a Christian perspective. I thought that was what people were going to recommend here but I guess not.
Thanks a lot! I already like it and am planning to place an order. Can anybody say something about it?
 

Brian Bosse

"The Brain"
Gentlemen,

I own Isaac Watt's book, and DO NOT recommend it for learning logic. It is archaic and not easy to follow. Stick with Copi or Hurley.

Brian
 
Status
Not open for further replies.
Top