Looking for classical education models/ideas not associated with Doug Wilson

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BayouHuguenot

Puritanboard Amanuensis
I used to be hostile to the classical education model simply because Doug Wilson was stamped all over it at conferences. Having since learned Latin and been to a few conferences, I like the idea. I don't like the Wilson books there, but you can't have everything.

What are some good books, ideals, models that promote classical ideas (trivium, etc) that aren't connected or dominated by Doug Wilson?
 

TylerRay

Puritan Board Graduate
Jacob,

I don't really have anything to recommend--I just want to point out that the paradigm out there is what I call the Sayers-Wilson model, or neoclassical education (they are both my terms, and you can take them or leave them). This is the model that applies the trivium to different stages of learning. This idea was first posited by Dorothy Sayers, and popularized by Doug Wilson.

In the original classical model (classical classical education?) the trivium was simply a collection of disciplines to be mastered in primary school before moving along to the quadrivium in secondary education.

Anything that treats the trivium as a series of learning stages has Wilson's fingerprints all over it, whether they name him or not.
 

TylerRay

Puritan Board Graduate
I think the Genetic Fallacy applies here brother.
Are you addressing me or Jacob? I can't see how either of us were making any sort of fallacious argument.

If you were addressing me, my point was simply that there are two schools of thought in classical education, one of which was thought up by Sayers and implemented/popularized by Wilson. If you can find me anyone (other than Sayers in her essay, "The Lost Tools of Learning") who lined the trivium up with learning stages before Wilson published Recovering the Lost Tools of Learning, then please do so. The modern classical education movement is based on Wilson's appropriation of Sayers. That's not to say that it is a faulty model; it's simply to say that it's a distinct educational philosophy that can be traced to Wilson.
 

TylerRay

Puritan Board Graduate
I'm talking to Jacob. I should have been clearer; my apologies.
Ah. I see it now--you're talking about his old position, right? That he was "hostile to the classical education model simply because Doug Wilson was stamped all over it at conferences." If that's what you're talking about then, I agree, it was a genetic fallacy and an ad hominem fallacy (No offense, Jacob!!), unless what he meant was that he was trying to avoid Wilson, and didn't feel that he could avoid Wilson's writings and still use a classical model.
 

Megs

Puritan Board Freshman
Most classical resources I am aware of seem to follow the three stage division a la Sayers (which is why I tend to use more Charlotte Mason resources instead).

There is one book I know of that does away with the stages idea but I haven't read it. It is called "Trivium Mastery: The Intersection of Three Roads: How to Give Your Child an Authentic Classical Home Education" by Diane Lockman and can be viewed here:

https://www.christianbook.com/trivi...1432733285/pd/273328?event=Homeschool|1005398
 

BayouHuguenot

Puritanboard Amanuensis
I'm talking to Jacob. I should have been clearer; my apologies.

Not exactly. In Rebuilding the Rooms Wilson explicitly endorsed nominalism. True, he later retracted that in a blog post, but the average reader won't know that and will come away thinking nominalism might be correct.

So it is not just the genetic fallacy. Bad ideas are involved which are in no way traceable to Sayers (whom I generally like).

And then everything about Wilson is just a moral and ecclesiastical trainwreck and I would rather not steer unsuspecting people that way.
 

BayouHuguenot

Puritanboard Amanuensis
Ah. I see it now--you're talking about his old position, right? That he was "hostile to the classical education model simply because Doug Wilson was stamped all over it at conferences." If that's what you're talking about then, I agree, it was a genetic fallacy and an ad hominem fallacy (No offense, Jacob!!), unless what he meant was that he was trying to avoid Wilson, and didn't feel that he could avoid Wilson's writings and still use a classical model.

Sort of. One of the foundational rules upon which I live my life is to avoid Doug Wilson at all costs. Both for my own soul's sake and for the well-being of any female friends or relatives who might think of going to Moscow, ID. But since I think one can appreciate Sayers and not be tied to Wilson, I think the neo-classical model can be salvaged.
 

LilyG

Puritan Board Freshman
I'm also wondering about the Classical Conversations model. Our local group, at least, seems very good.
 

ZackF

Puritan Board Post-Graduate
I'm also wondering about the Classical Conversations model. Our local group, at least, seems very good.
Looks cool but pricey. My wife met with a CCer but for now we are taking another path.
 

bookslover

Puritan Board Doctor
Tying Dorothy Sayers to Doug Wilson is an insult to Sayers.

Also, try this book: The Trivium: The Liberal Arts of Logic, Grammar, and Rhetoric: Understanding the Nature and Function of Language by Sister Miriam Joseph; edited by Marguerite McGlinn; reprint (Philadelphia: Paul Dry Books, 2002). Originally published in 1937.

From the back flap: Sister Miriam Joseph (1898-1982) [was] a gifted teacher and Shakespeare scholar; [she] influenced a generation of women to think carefully, to read thoughtfully, and to write and speak the right principles eloquently.

She earned her Ph.D from Columbia University, and taught English at St. Mary's College from 1931 to 1960. Don't let the fact that she was Catholic put you off. This is a detailed, well-written volume the describes and demonstrates the classical trivium.
 

BayouHuguenot

Puritanboard Amanuensis
Tying Dorothy Sayers to Doug Wilson is an insult to Sayers.

Also, try this book: The Trivium: The Liberal Arts of Logic, Grammar, and Rhetoric: Understanding the Nature and Function of Language by Sister Miriam Joseph; edited by Marguerite McGlinn; reprint (Philadelphia: Paul Dry Books, 2002). Originally published in 1937.

From the back flap: Sister Miriam Joseph (1898-1982) [was] a gifted teacher and Shakespeare scholar; [she] influenced a generation of women to think carefully, to read thoughtfully, and to write and speak the right principles eloquently.

She earned her Ph.D from Columbia University, and taught English at St. Mary's College from 1931 to 1960. Don't let the fact that she was Catholic put you off. This is a detailed, well-written volume the describes and demonstrates the classical trivium.

Many of the good educational resources are going to come from Catholics, since they were always anti-public school because of its perceived Protestant Establishment.
 

Heather

Puritan Board Freshman
These are the books that are on my short list for classic classical education (i.e. non- Sayers):

Norms and Nobility: A Treatise on Education by David Hicks

The Liberal Arts Tradition: A Philosophy of Christian Classical Education by Ravi Jain and Kevin Clark

Consider This: Charlotte Mason and the Classical Tradition by Karen Glass


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Wayne

Tempus faciendi, Domine.
For a thought provoker, check out William Dennison's article in the OPC's 75th anniversary volume, Confident of Better Things.
 

bookslover

Puritan Board Doctor
Here's this, from a book I'm now reading:

"The Seven Liberal Arts comprised in the Trivium and the Quadrivium were the basis of all secular education. The Trivium - Grammar, Rhetoric, and Dialectic - included a smattering of classics and philology, the study of Latin, the reading and writing of prose and verse. It included, probably, the elements of Roman Law. It included, also, the study of logic, which opened the gates of philosophy and metaphysics, the key to a world of mystery which awed and fascinated the medieval mind. The Quadrivium, which led to a wider course of study as knowledge expanded and the available materials increased, consisted of Music, Arithmetic, Geometry, and Astronomy, but it taught little, at first, beyond the elements of each. Music gave the rules for plain-song. Arithmetic helped to calculate the date of Easter. Geometry included geography, often, in its details, imaginative enough, and a few incomplete propositions from Euclid. Astronomy explored the movements of the planets and unfolded the wisdom of the stars. . .

"The Seven Liberal Arts of the Middle Ages, which came to be regarded as the foundation of knowledge, may trace their ancestry back to Plato, who furnished the medieval world with so many of its ideas. But we do not know, for certain, who is responsible for the number fixed or the selection made. There is no obvious reason why the list should have excluded arts like architecture and medicine, which were widely acknowledged as liberal studies. . .It can hardly be contended that the Seven Arts at any time represented the sum of human knowledge, all that was thought worth studying by the medieval world. But, they did represent, for many generations, in days when education was still struggling for existence, the framework of the most familiar learning which a greater civilization had adopted and approved."

From: A History of the University of Oxford: Volume I: The Medieval University and the Colleges Founded in the Middle Ages by Charles Edward Mallet (London: Methuen & Co., Ltd., 1924), pp. 5-6.
 

ZackF

Puritan Board Post-Graduate
Tying Dorothy Sayers to Doug Wilson is an insult to Sayers.

Also, try this book: The Trivium: The Liberal Arts of Logic, Grammar, and Rhetoric: Understanding the Nature and Function of Language by Sister Miriam Joseph; edited by Marguerite McGlinn; reprint (Philadelphia: Paul Dry Books, 2002). Originally published in 1937.

From the back flap: Sister Miriam Joseph (1898-1982) [was] a gifted teacher and Shakespeare scholar; [she] influenced a generation of women to think carefully, to read thoughtfully, and to write and speak the right principles eloquently.

She earned her Ph.D from Columbia University, and taught English at St. Mary's College from 1931 to 1960. Don't let the fact that she was Catholic put you off. This is a detailed, well-written volume the describes and demonstrates the classical trivium.

Sayers wasn't Catholic though not without her sympathies. She was incensed that Rome didn't recognize Anglican orders as valid.
 

Jonathan R

Puritan Board Freshman
The Liberal Arts Tradition: A Philosophy of Christian Classical Education by Ravi Jain and Kevin Clark

This was a pretty good book - especially in showing how the liberal arts are a whole unit of study, not necessarily a method to be followed.

One other not yet mentioned book is:

The Scholastic Curriculum at Early Seventheenth Century Cambridge by William T Costello

It was helpful for an actual historical perspective on a true "classical" education.
 

Jeri Tanner

Moderator
Staff member
This is simply a curriculum, but I was impressed with the Tapestry of Grace material years ago when homeschooling our daughter.
 
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