Looking for recommendations: Christian music CDs

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tabrooks

Puritan Board Freshman
I imagine that one's taste in Christian music varies considerably, but I'm looking for your top recommendations for Christian music CDs.

I'd prefer something majestic, beautiful, and Scriptural (e.g. Handel's Messiah would be a great example), but I'm willing to consider what had deeply impacted you.

Thanks, ahead of time, for your recommendations!

Thomas
 

JBaldwin

Puritan Board Post-Graduate
Much of John Rutter's choral works are amazing. I was looking at "I Will Lift Up Mine Eyes" just the other day. Several of the movements of his Requiem are also quite nice.

Vivaldi's "Gloria" is also nice, as are many of the Bach chorals.
 

nwink

Puritan Board Sophomore
Well, it's not the same type of music as Handel's Messiah, but it is Scriptural -- the band Sons of Korah sings renditions of different Psalms to a contemporary music style.

Sons of Korah
 

Jared

Puritan Board Freshman
Depends on what you're looking for.

Here are some artists that I think most of the people here would enjoy:

Keith & Kristyn Getty
Sovereign Grace Music
Indelible Grace Music
Billy & Cindy Foote
Shane & Shane
 

VictorBravo

Administrator
Staff member
And Bach's St. Matthew Passion. St. John Passion as well.

Also, Brahms Requiem--nothing but Scripture for the libretto and it is Romantic-era music as it ought to be: manly, solid, not florid.
 

tabrooks

Puritan Board Freshman
Bach's Cantata's. Make sure you get the English lyrics, they are sung in Deutsch.

Do you have a link? I looked for this on amazon and there was a dizzying array of options -- not sure which one you are referring to exactly. thanks! Thomas
 

py3ak

Unshaven and anonymous
Staff member
Although Handel's Messiah is most famous, there are numerous oratorios on Biblical themes, and some from church history as well. Carissimi, Vivaldi, Handel, Haydn and Mendelssohn all composed oratorios worth listening to, and they are more readily available in good recordings than before. Handel's Solomon is a good place to begin.
 

seajayrice

Puritan Board Sophomore
Bach's Cantata's. Make sure you get the English lyrics, they are sung in Deutsch.

Do you have a link? I looked for this on amazon and there was a dizzying array of options -- not sure which one you are referring to exactly. thanks! Thomas

I own the complete Helmuth Rilling cantata cycle Helmuth Rilling - Bach Cantatas & Other Vocal Works - Recordings - Part 1 works. Helmut Rilling on Bach Cantata No. 79

Bach was prolific as are his best interpreters.

[video=youtube_share;5Wc83-8dH2A]http://youtu.be/5Wc83-8dH2A[/video] Here is some background from Rilling at the Oregon Bach festival, a little technical. Try youtube for a sampling.
 

Theoretical

Puritan Board Professor
Crown and Covenant has some spectacular psalms:

MusicMeditation is particularly beautiful, with all of Psalm 119 being sung.

A somewhat ponderous but nonetheless glorious work is Mendelssohn's Symphony No. 2: The Hymn of Praise. Most of the 9 choral movements are Psalms from the Gutenberg Bible.
 

Philip

Puritan Board Graduate
Bach's Mass in B Minor is a good start. I also enjoy Vaughan Williams' Mass in G Minor.

Vaughan Williams also composed two Te Deums, the Five Mystical Songs (settings of the poetry of George Herbert) and his various motets.

I should also recommend Thomas Tallis, court composer to four Tudor monarchs, who wrote works like Spem in Alium (a motet for forty voices), a series of Psalm tunes for Archbishop Parker, and a whole bunch of other stuff, all a capella choral.
 

Tripel

Puritan Board Senior
Also, Brahms Requiem--nothing but Scripture for the libretto and it is Romantic-era music as it ought to be: manly, solid, not florid.

Ah, yes.... WONDERFUL recommendation. "How Lovely is Thy Dwelling Place" is one of my favorite pieces.
 

tabrooks

Puritan Board Freshman
Many thanks for all who have contributed to this thread so far (its greatly appreciated). I've already made a several orders based on your recommendations.
 

jwithnell

Moderator
Staff member
And Bach's St. Matthew Passion. St. John Passion as well.
Ditto! I still remember "discovering" these in my college library and just sitting there transfixed.

Mendelssohn's Elijah should be among your early acquisitions. The Mozart Requiem has some questionable trappings, but it is a tremendous musical work. I love where the four solo voices intermingle with each other. Just had the link: there are some antiphonal elements that are gorgeous: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6IvRUVHOiK8

Robert Shaw is (was) one of America's foremost choral conductors, though there are some compositions, such as Messiah, that he takes too fast for my taste.
 
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