Maranatha??

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tcalbrecht

Puritan Board Junior
For those who aren't Hillary Duff fans (neither am I), the issue of the Christian's use of the term Maranatha with the thought "we can still say it" came up.

I wrote:

Can we? I've wondered about this. If the statement in Rev. 22 was primarily regarding the soon to come events of AD70, then the cry to "come quickly" makes sense to only those people. God judgment demanded that action be taken quickly against the apostacy of Judaism.

"And behold, I am coming quickly, and My reward is with Me, to give to every one according to his work."

"Do not seal the words of the prophecy of this book, for the time is at hand."

By way of contrast we are told that the Master is gone on a long journey (Matt. 25:19). In the meantime we have been given talents to use for Him until He returns. The longer He is away the more time we have to make the most of His talents.

I'm not sure that "Maranatha" should be the cry of the Church today.

Comments?
 

ReformedWretch

Puritan Board Doctor
I think you make a good point. If the great comission consists of reacing the world for Christ, and He won't come until that is done (according to His will of course) then should we be calling for him to come quickly?

I am not sure at this point, but look forward to all the intresting points that are going to be made.:bigsmile:
 

tcalbrecht

Puritan Board Junior
Sometimes the passage in 2 Peter 3 is used to justify the "maranatha" position:

"Therefore, since all these things will be dissolved, what manner of persons ought you to be in holy conduct and godliness, looking for and hastening the coming of the day of God, because of which the heavens will be dissolved, being on fire, and the elements will melt with fervent heat?"

Gill comments that Christians "should be hasting to it by their readiness for it, having their loins girt, and their lights burning, and their lamps trimmed, and they waiting for their Lord's coming, and going forth in acts of faith and love, and in the duties of religion, to meet him, and not slumber and sleep:"

In other words, by doing His revealed will we "hastened" the day of the Lord. The day itself is fixed, but like all human activities the time seems to go faster when we are found diligently working.
 

LadyFlynt

Puritan Board Doctor
okay, so we should do our business and not say "Lord, come". However, isn't saying it more of a way of showing that we look forward to it?
 

Augusta

Puritan Board Doctor
I for one look forward to it. I am so sensative lately to sin, in myself and all around me. I think this is part of the reforming process. As a dispie arminian I would see and judge "why don't these people see that Jesus is the way" now I see it and my heart sinks and I praise God for saving me from it. I get overwelmed and pray God please come soon or take me soon. Is this wrong? I am still working through the many years of error and false teaching. Trying so hard to get things right fast, maybe too fast but I am like a starving sheep who now has food and can't stop gourging.
 

tdowns

Puritan Board Junior
Maranatha!

As a ref. on the Hillary thread I wrote:

"I'm just pumped they all still love to listen to "People get ready, Jesus is coming, soon we'll be going home..." by Crystal Lewis. I know she's calvary chapel and prob. Dispensational and armin and everything else, but bottom line, the song cries Maranatha! I love singing that with my kids, cuz even though all our rapture/Dispensational stuff is out the window, Praise God, even as Partial Prets, we can still say, Lord come quickly, Maranatha!!!

TD

P.S. (I think) Half the time I think I have a handle on something that is solid in reformed eyes, I read something else that makes me think, huh? Not really half the time, mainly the Arminian is false gospel/no their a true church debate."



Then this was stated:


Originally posted by tcalbrecht
For those who aren't Hillary Duff fans (neither am I), the issue of the Christian's use of the term Maranatha with the thought "we can still say it" came up.

I wrote:

Can we? I've wondered about this. If the statement in Rev. 22 was primarily regarding the soon to come events of AD70, then the cry to "come quickly" makes sense to only those people. God judgment demanded that action be taken quickly against the apostacy of Judaism.

"And behold, I am coming quickly, and My reward is with Me, to give to every one according to his work."

"Do not seal the words of the prophecy of this book, for the time is at hand."

By way of contrast we are told that the Master is gone on a long journey (Matt. 25:19). In the meantime we have been given talents to use for Him until He returns. The longer He is away the more time we have to make the most of His talents.

I'm not sure that "Maranatha" should be the cry of the Church today.

Comments?



:lol:That's pretty funny. When I wrote the Hillary Duff response, I just put out the Maranatha, because that's what came to mind and that's what the CLewis song is about. I figured, that even though some of us are Part. Prets, we still wait for the Lord's return, so obviously it must be a good thing to say, Maranatha.
Then, just as an afterthought, I put the P.S., cuz I thought to myself, sure enough, somehow this is wrong, like many of my other beliefs... And, whether or not it's wrong I don't know yet, but here we are with a discussion on how it could very well be wrong.
It goes to show how many theological ideas I have and had that really were not thought out or checked out with scripture.

Having said that,

I yearn and hope for the Lord to come quickly, just like I yearn and hope for my neighbor's salvation, both are in the Lord's hands, and I don't know when the first will happen, and I don't know when or if the second will happen, but I know I want both, so within God's will, I still say "Lord Come Quickly." I still say, "Lord save my neighbor."

Another element to the topic:
I remember hearing people say they didn't want the Lord to return until this that or the other thing... I never understood that, if the Lord returns, it's because it is time to return, and heaven will be sweeter than anything we gain here. As much as I enjoy and truly love life here on this planet, I long for being sin free in heaven.

[Edited on 3-7-2005 by tdowns007]
 

pastorway

Puritan Board Senior
Maranatha Indeed!

Even the Book of Revelation closes "Behold I am coming quickly."

The word maranatha is used in 1 Cor 16:22 and it means certain judgment for the lost and final redemption for the elect. According to my Greek lexicon (BAGD) there is manuscript evidence that shows that the word itself was used as a one word prayer in the early church said in unison after observing communion.

Here is how we explain Maranatha on our church website (Maranatha Community Church) :

About Us

Maranatha "“ this identifies our hope! The word maranatha appears only once in Scripture, in 1 Corinthians 16:22. There Paul writes, "œIf anyone does not love the Lord Jesus Christ, let him be accursed. O Lord, come!" As he is closing out this letter to the church at Corinth he uses a play on words to convey two realities. The first is that those who do not love the Lord Jesus Christ will be "œaccursed," which is translated from the word "œanathema." It is the passing of judgment. Then he immediately follows "œanathema" with the word "œmaranatha" which in the text is translated as "œO Lord, come!" This is the second reality, in contrast to anathema. It refers to an expectant plea for the soon return of Jesus Christ. In fact, other writings from the period of the early church show us that the church would utter "œmaranatha" as a one word prayer at the conclusion of Communion observances. The reality is that one will either love the Lord Jesus and yearn for His return, or hate Him, and His coming will mean judgment. Our hearts echo the cry of hope and love, "œMaranatha "“ O Lord, come!"

Community- this identifies who we are. We are a community, a family of people from all walks of life, who have been called by God to faith in His Son. We serve one another, ministering to and encouraging each other in love. We are a distinct community, identified by the genuine fellowship we enjoy with each other and the care we have for all those God has placed around us. We are members of one body seeking to "œpreserve the unity of the Spirit in peace" (Eph. 4:3). Jesus prayed "œthat they all may be one, as You , Father, are in Me, and I in You; that they may be one in Us, that the world may believe that You sent Me." (John 17:21). That prayer is fulfilled when we, as a community of believers, love one another. In fact, love is proof of our faith! (See 1 John 2:3-5; 4:7-11; 5:1-3).

Church "“ this identifies what we are. We are a local church. In the New Testament, the word translated church is "œekklesia". It means literally "œthe called out ones." We have been called out by God to forsake our sin and embrace His Son and each other. We have been called to "œGo therefore and make disciples"¦baptizing them in the name of the Father and of the Son and of the Holy Spirit, teaching them to observe all things that I have commanded you;" (Matthew 28:19-20). The church is not a building, a location, or an organization. It is His designation for the assembly of people called by His name. As such, our course has been charted by God; our destiny has been planned by God; our members have been chosen by God; our purposes have been defined by God. We exist as a church to glorify Him, obey Him, serve Him, honor Him, praise Him, and love Him above all else in this life.

http://users3.ev1.net/~maranathachurch/believe.html

Phillip
 

VirginiaHuguenot

Puritanboard Librarian
Westminster Confession of Faith, Chap. XXXIII:

III. As Christ would have us to be certainly persuaded that there shall be a day of judgment, both to deter all men from sin; and for the greater consolation of the godly in their adversity:[6] so will He have that day unknown to men, that they may shake off all carnal security, and be always watchful, because they know not at what hour the Lord will come; and may be ever prepared to say, Come Lord Jesus, come quickly, Amen.[7]
 

tcalbrecht

Puritan Board Junior
Originally posted by pastorway
Maranatha Indeed!

Even the Book of Revelation closes "Behold I am coming quickly."

The word maranatha is used in 1 Cor 16:22 and it means certain judgment for the lost and final redemption for the elect. According to my Greek lexicon (BAGD) there is manuscript evidence that shows that the word itself was used as a one word prayer in the early church said in unison after observing communion.

Well that would fit with the theme of Revelation with Christ coming in judgment against apostate Israel. Christ did indeed come quickly against His and the church's enemies.

Why not "Anathema Maranatha"? :bigsmile:
 

BlackCalvinist

Puritan Board Senior
headshake.gif

I'm not sure that "Maranatha" should be the cry of the Church today.

So glad I can stand side by side with my amill brothers and say Maranatha!

:) :amen:
 

VERITAS

Puritan Board Freshman
As a Christian and a preterist looking forward to the Coming of the Lord, I feel perfectly comfortable saying marantha. Whether it is in regard to His Second Advent or any Coming/Judgment of His upon those who do not love the Lord.

If the tsunami was a Judgment of the Lord and it becomes a vehicle through which His Gospel is able to make inroads into countries and the hearts of people who were before hardened to Him, then I welcome such Judgments. Ultimately people don't die "before their time" and God could melt the entire heart of the world in a moment, in the twinkling of an eye. So, I don't worry that there MIGHT HAVE BEEN people who WOULD HAVE BEEN saved IF Jesus just held off on His Coming for a few more years, or decades or centuries. The Lord knows those that are His (2 Tim 2:19) and how to deliver the godly (2 Pet 2:9). Not one sparrow falls to the ground apart from the Will of The Father, how much more one of His elect?

But judgment - whether temporal or eternal - is both sweet and bitter (Rev 10:9-10). Sweet for those delivered, but also a little bitter when we see the consequences of sin and then the judgment on those who know not and/or reject the Love of God (Jer 2:19). That should make US all the more grateful for such a great Salvation as that which He has lavished on US.

The other thing is that I wouldn't necessarily think that 1 Cor 16:22 is an eschatological passage - i.e. dealing with the end of the Old Covenant economy. I think that it's a simple statement of the power of Christ over His enemies, whoever they might be - Jew or Gentile, whenever they might live - past, present or future to Paul and thus a general statement that all the faithful can utter at any point in history.

The 7 churches at the opening of His Revelation are no longer there, so they must have come under the judgment of God at some point in history (not necessarily and probably not anywhere near AD 70). If their members ceased to "love the Lord," then I say a curse on them as well. Marantha! If anyone living today rejects the Love of God, then a curse on them - Marantha! For those who seek to set up wickedness in society as a standard to emulate, who eschew good and do evil, then Marantha!

Grace and Peace to YOU ALL from God OUR Father and from OUR Lord, Jesus, Christ. Marantha!
 

pastorway

Puritan Board Senior
Maranatha is not a curse. Anathema is. They are two different words.

Maranatha is a plea for Christ to return. Yes this means judgment for the lost, but it is not a curse.

Phillip
 

tdowns

Puritan Board Junior
Whew!

I've had friends in the past say they were encouraged by my enthusiasim for life here on earth, while also having a desire for the Lord to come quickly. They admited that sometimes they wanted the Lord to tary, so that they may accomplish more goals; babies, wife, etc...

I'm glad I wasn't off in looking forward to that day, even hoping it could be today, but praising him for every day he continues to allow me to serve, and to enjoy His wonderful creation. Maranatha!!!!
 

VERITAS

Puritan Board Freshman
Originally posted by pastorway
Maranatha "“ this identifies our hope! The word maranatha appears only once in Scripture, in 1 Corinthians 16:22. There Paul writes, "œIf anyone does not love the Lord Jesus Christ, let him be accursed. O Lord, come!" As he is closing out this letter to the church at Corinth he uses a play on words to convey two realities. The first is that those who do not love the Lord Jesus Christ will be "œaccursed," which is translated from the word "œanathema." It is the passing of judgment. Then he immediately follows "œanathema" with the word "œmaranatha" which in the text is translated as "œO Lord, come!" ...In fact, other writings from the period of the early church show us that the church would utter "œmaranatha" as a one word prayer at the conclusion of Communion observances. The reality is that one will either love the Lord Jesus and yearn for His return, or hate Him, and His coming will mean judgment

Originally posted by pastorway
Maranatha is not a curse. Anathema is. They are two different words.

Maranatha is a plea for Christ to return. Yes this means judgment for the lost, but it is not a curse.

"If anyone does not love the Lord--a curse be on him. Come, O Lord!" --1 Cor 16:22, NIV


[Edited on 3-14-2005 by VERITAS]

[edited to remove an inappropriate link]

[Edited on 3-14-05 by pastorway]
 

pastorway

Puritan Board Senior
I never said that His coming would not mean judgment for the lost. But crying for His coming is not a curse or a cry for vengence. We look forward to seeing Him. Our concern about His coming should not have anything to do with the lost. We should desire to see face to face the One who gave Himself for us.

Why would we curse the lost anyway? I would think it necessary in loving our neighbor and blessing those who curse us that we pray for their salvation so that they are not judged when Christ returns.

Maranatha was a one word prayer of HOPE and EXPECTATION in the early church that followed communion observances. It was not a vengeful cry for the lost to be damned. In fact, if one's focus about the coming of Christ is not on Christ, but on the lost, then people are looking the wrong way.

Phillip
 

Craig

Puritan Board Senior
Can I ask what Hillary Duff has to do with "Maranatha" or Crystal Lewis? I am not sure what the relation (if any) is.
 
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