Matthew Mead on God’s judgment against covetousness and unmercifulness

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Reformed Covenanter

Cancelled Commissioner
Amongst the rest of our common sins we may account Covetousness, together with all the discoveries, effects and branches of it; Such as Oppression, Extortion, Bribery, Injustice, either in judgment or mutual traffic, over-reaching each other, Uncharitableness, and grinding the faces of the Poor.

I put all these together, as having some relation to each other, and being all neglects of duty betwixt man and man. If Idolatry so often brought the Plague, or other Sufferings upon the Israelites, why may not Covetousness which is Idolatry, by the same reason bring it upon us: Is it not as displeasing to God to have men adore an heap of Gold and Silver, or their Houses and Lands, as an Image of Gold made up into humane shape? And is it not as great a sin, for the heart to run a whoring after these things, as to bow the body to an Idol? ...

Oh how many are there that will be Religious, as far as coming to Church, and being devout there, and making some outside Profession, who yet in their dealings are stark naught, and will be dishonest for a small gain? In the Church, and perhaps a little in their Closets, they can afford to do, that they call serving of God, but in their Shops nothing at all. Oh by that time all’s reckoned for, when the money's gone, but the sin in getting it must be answered for, how will men wish, and wish again they had been clear from this guilt, though they had been the meanest beggars in the Land? now how just is it man should be snatched from those estates, to which they never had a true title? And if indeed they cannot drive a trade without so great miscarriages, Is it not time that their Houses and Shops should be shut up? ...

For more, see Matthew Mead on God’s judgment against covetousness and unmercifulness.
 
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