Nimrod, the first Coup. Shows man is good by nature.

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Anton Bruckner

Puritan Board Professor
Yesterday and today I was basically consumed with Genesis, specifically in the early postflood era before Abraham. What I found interesting is that while Noah was still alive, Nimrod basically instigated a coup and won, thereby turning the people from Godly worship unto his own self exaltation.

What is even more monstrous is that Ham, Shem and Japeth were still alive, and were basically powerless against Nimrod's tyrrany. Imagine this guy was living directly in the presence of people that witnessed the preflood world, the terrible judgements and mercy of God, and he willingly rebelled.

Today I picked up Josephus Antiquities and read that Nimrod was arrogant enough to think that if God did him anything wrong which would be just, that he would avenge himself on God. (attempted Deicide).

Now I'm trying earnestly to fathom, Noah is there, Shem, Japeth and Ham is there, the Ark is over yonder, and you have God's word saying worship Me and spread out over the earth, and you decide, "To heck with it, I'm doing my own thing".

This elucidates the saying of Jesus, "If they wouldn't hear Moses and the prophets, neither would they believe if one raises from the dead."
 

sastark

Puritan Board Graduate
Keon, I believe it is in the book The Two Babylons that the author (Rev. Hisplop) theorizes that Shem may have executed Nimrod, putting into action the "new" command of God "Whosoever sheds man's blood, by man his blood shall be shed." (Gen. 9:6) You may want to check it out.
 

ChristopherPaul

Puritan Board Senior
Very interesting thoughts.

However, I am confused by the title to this thread. How does any of this show man is good by nature?
 

Anton Bruckner

Puritan Board Professor
Originally posted by ChristopherPaul
Very interesting thoughts.

However, I am confused by the title to this thread. How does any of this show man is good by nature?
irony :D

Seth, while I haven't read that particular work, I haven't seen much evidence that Shem killed Nimrod. I think the only thing that could have defeated Nimrod's raise was the confounding of the languages. Nimrod seemed to have been a charismatic tyrrant in that he got all the people to agree with him.

Interestingly he descended from Ham, who was cursed. This family seem to always be at odds with righteousness, hence Noah's cursing them. This cursing on Canaan, I presumed alienated the family more, hence their children were able to run wild without any moral anchor.

I could just imagine, Noah calling the clan together for a sacrifice, and Nimrod and the Hamitic clan simply saying, "Why go, he obviously doesn't like us, those bunch of show offs".

My other musings is that, (let's face it, acts of righteousness is burdensome if one does not love God. check out the people that yawn in church) Nimrod was able to exploit this passive form of righteousness by showing them a "better way", which was nothing short of hedonism, ambition and doing as one pleases. Ironically, the Canaanites were a sexually loose idol worshipping people.

Thus we have something similar like our society, where the Christians are literally pleading with their fellow Americans to turn to God, whilst, their fellow Americans are following the "better way", which is money, sex and power.

Its exploitation of these sinful desires I think made Nimrod successful in his coup, hence this is how the tyrrany began and idol worshipping spread. Idol worshipping was so diffused amongst the early people by Nimrod, that I think even in Abraham's home and village of Ur, those people had become idol worshippers and Shem was still alive.
 
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