Octavious Winslow on the King James

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Gesetveemet

Puritan Board Sophomore
This is a small quote from THE PRESIOUSNESS OF GOD'S WORD by Octavious Winslow The whole chapter goes from page 253 to page 295 with the subject about the WARNING OF A NEW VERSION beginning around page 285 and ending about page 293. I believe it is worth the time to read. Please feel free to add other quotes. Also you will not find these pages on other online versions.

It may not be out of place, in a chapter devoted to the preciousness of God's Word, and may form a suitable close, to submit to the serious attention of the reader a few observations bearing upon the character of the recieved English version of the Bible; and to enter our solemn caveat against a proposition which has obtained, having for its object the disturbance and displacement of the the present translation, by the substitution of an emended or new translation of the sacred scriptures. Our views and feelings upon this subject are as decided and strong as they are devoutly and maturely considered. We cannot but look upon such a proposition as not only uncalled for by the unanamous voice of the Christian Church, and not required by the events of her history or the state of the world, but as likely to prove most disastrous to the intrests of pure, evengelical religion. That the present version of the Bible, as a human production, is perfect we affirm not. There are passages the meaning of which other renderings might more cleary eludicate - words that are obsolete - expressions that are obscure - phrases that may chime somewhat harshly upon the refined ear; be it so - the Bible, as a translation, is the work of man ! and what work of man ever issued from his hands complete ? Any version of the Scriptures offered to us as a substitute for the present, must not only necessarly be an imperfect production, but would, doudtless, from the cicumstances in which it would be prepared, contain renderings yet more erroneous, phrases yet more objectionable, defects and blemishes yet more plapable and glaring than the one which we now posses.


The precious things of God - Google Books





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Gesetveemet

Puritan Board Sophomore
This is a small quote from THE PRESIOUSNESS OF GOD'S WORD by Octavious Winslow The whole chapter goes from page 253 to page 295 with the subject about the WARNING OF A NEW VERSION beginning around page 285 and ending about page 293. I believe it is worth the time to read. Please feel free to add other quotes. Also you will not find these pages on other online versions.

It may not be out of place, in a chapter devoted to the preciousness of God's Word, and may form a suitable close, to submit to the serious attention of the reader a few observations bearing upon the character of the recieved English version of the Bible; and to enter our solemn caveat against a proposition which has obtained, having for its object the disturbance and displacement of the the present translation, by the substitution of an emended or new translation of the sacred scriptures. Our views and feelings upon this subject are as decided and strong as they are devoutly and maturely considered. We cannot but look upon such a proposition as not only uncalled for by the unanamous voice of the Christian Church, and not required by the events of her history or the state of the world, but as likely to prove most disastrous to the intrests of pure, evengelical religion. That the present version of the Bible, as a human production, is perfect we affirm not. There are passages the meaning of which other renderings might more cleary eludicate - words that are obsolete - expressions that are obscure - phrases that may chime somewhat harshly upon the refined ear; be it so - the Bible, as a translation, is the work of man ! and what work of man ever issued from his hands complete ? Any version of the Scriptures offered to us as a substitute for the present, must not only necessarly be an imperfect production, but would, doudtless, from the cicumstances in which it would be prepared, contain renderings yet more erroneous, phrases yet more objectionable, defects and blemishes yet more plapable and glaring than the one which we now posses.


The precious things of God - Google Books

Another portion of Winslow. The SDG reprint (1993) I believe is out of print and I have yet to find an online version that has not been altered.

The general fidelity of the work as a translation,-its "pure well of
English undefiled,"-its Anglo-Saxon terseness,-the crystal clearness, distinctness,
and beauty with which the fundamental verities of our faith-the great
essential doctrines of the gospel-are presented to the mind of the most simple
and unlearned, are so many demonstrations in its favour, clustering like
sentinels around the most magnificent and stupendous monument of our
language which the world possesses. We have remarked, that to supplant
this ancient and endeared translation by a modern and strange one,
would be hazardous. Much would be risked, little would be gained.
A door would at once be opened, through which would rush a tide of
innovation and error, sweeping away the ancient and sacred landmarks
of learning, and truth, and godliness. The Church of God, standing
before her foes with the humiliating acknowledgment that for ages she
had been battling' with a corrupt and frail instrument,-confronting error
with error, wielding a weapon of spurious and uncertain temper,-would
be shorn of her strength, and tarnished of her glory. The enemies of the
Bible, ever watching for our halting, would exult at the confession, and
employ their triumph in engrafting upon its holy pages their preconceived
opinions and favourite heresies; and thus playing into the hands of the
infidel .and the Romanist, the pantheist and the materialist, we should be
found fraternising with the Hegels, the Strausses, the Newmans, the
Maurices of our day. For these reasons, and others as weighty, we solemnly
and earnestly protest against a new or revised version of the English Bible,
preferring it, with all its faults, as it is.
 
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