Probation

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Ravens

Puritan Board Sophomore
I know that the "probationary" idea attached to the covenant of works is often criticized by people, or seen as eisegesis, rather than exegesis.

I believe in it, in the traditional fashion; I was thinking about how I would respond to such people. Would not the fact that Christ "fulfilled" the covenant of works, performed it, accomplished it, and imparted the benefits thereof to the elect, imply that it was, by its very nature, probationary?

In other words, Christ didn't have to live an endless life under the covenant of works; He lived a definite amount of time, made His substitutionary sacrifice, was resurrected and exalted. So do I legitimately infer from this that the covenant of works can Biblically be described as able to be "fulfilled" within a limited duration of time, thus proving some time of probation?
 

AV1611

Puritan Board Senior
I know that the "probationary" idea attached to the covenant of works is often criticized by people, or seen as eisegesis, rather than exegesis.

I believe in it, in the traditional fashion; I was thinking about how I would respond to such people. Would not the fact that Christ "fulfilled" the covenant of works, performed it, accomplished it, and imparted the benefits thereof to the elect, imply that it was, by its very nature, probationary?

In other words, Christ didn't have to live an endless life under the covenant of works; He lived a definite amount of time, made His substitutionary sacrifice, was resurrected and exalted. So do I legitimately infer from this that the covenant of works can Biblically be described as able to be "fulfilled" within a limited duration of time, thus proving some time of probation?

The covenant must be understood as a relationship between God and Adam. The whole 'modern' understanding of the CoW is wrong in my humble opinion.
 

Puritan Sailor

Puritan Board Doctor
I know that the "probationary" idea attached to the covenant of works is often criticized by people, or seen as eisegesis, rather than exegesis.

I believe in it, in the traditional fashion; I was thinking about how I would respond to such people. Would not the fact that Christ "fulfilled" the covenant of works, performed it, accomplished it, and imparted the benefits thereof to the elect, imply that it was, by its very nature, probationary?

In other words, Christ didn't have to live an endless life under the covenant of works; He lived a definite amount of time, made His substitutionary sacrifice, was resurrected and exalted. So do I legitimately infer from this that the covenant of works can Biblically be described as able to be "fulfilled" within a limited duration of time, thus proving some time of probation?

I think you are correct. You could also look at the law/inheritance principle. The law teaches a reward for obedience.
 

Irishcat922

Puritan Board Sophomore
I was on probation once. I did not like it I had to do community service, and pay alot of fines and report to a probation officer and she wasn't very nice. Overall not a good experience.:D
 
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