Prosper of Aquitaine on the Pelagian distortion of grace

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Reformed Covenanter

Cancelled Commissioner
... The Pelagians first wished to say that human nature is perfectly sound and able to attain the kingdom of God by its unaided free will, the reason being that nature finds help enough in the very gift of creation. Being naturally endowed with reason and intellect, it can easily choose what is good and avoid what is evil. And since the will is equally free for both good and evil, if men are wicked it is not because they lack the ability to do good but the endeavour to do it. ...

They meant to say that what the call of grace does first is to admonish the freedom of our wills; that grace is nothing else than the law, the prophet, the teacher: these take care in a general way of all men, so that those who wish can believe, and those who believe can obtain justification through the merit of their faith and of their good will; that accordingly God’s grace is given in answer to men’s merits. In this manner, grace is no longer grace, because, if it is rendered for merit and does not itself cause what is good in man, then its name is meaningless. ...

For more, see Prosper of Aquitaine on the Pelagian distortion of grace.
 

arapahoepark

Puritan Board Post-Graduate
... The Pelagians first wished to say that human nature is perfectly sound and able to attain the kingdom of God by its unaided free will, the reason being that nature finds help enough in the very gift of creation. Being naturally endowed with reason and intellect, it can easily choose what is good and avoid what is evil. And since the will is equally free for both good and evil, if men are wicked it is not because they lack the ability to do good but the endeavour to do it. ...

They meant to say that what the call of grace does first is to admonish the freedom of our wills; that grace is nothing else than the law, the prophet, the teacher: these take care in a general way of all men, so that those who wish can believe, and those who believe can obtain justification through the merit of their faith and of their good will; that accordingly God’s grace is given in answer to men’s merits. In this manner, grace is no longer grace, because, if it is rendered for merit and does not itself cause what is good in man, then its name is meaningless. ...

For more, see Prosper of Aquitaine on the Pelagian distortion of grace.
Are his wrtings available online like his chronicles on the Pelagian controversy?
 
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