Question for Baptists

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John Lanier

Puritan Board Junior
I'm not sure if this is a genuine question but...

First of all, it is a silly song. I don't really want my kids singing it because it is too childish. I would rather they sang something with more meat than that.

As to your question, which I am assuming really is:

Would a Baptist let their children sing a song whose lyrics say "Father Abraham had many sons. Many sons had Father Abraham. I am one of them and so are you..." since the Baptist believes the child is not a child of Abraham unless they are elect (and therefore will make a future profession of faith)?

If you really want an answer and we can assume that the Baptist actually likes the song (which I don't), then the Baptist answer would be that if the child is a Christian then they would have no problem singing the song saying they are a true child of Abraham. The real children of Abraham are the elect of God not those of physical descent from Abraham or any other Christian.


"But it is not that the word of God has taken no effect. For they are not all Israel who are of Israel, nor are they all children because they are the seed of Abraham; but, “In Isaac your seed shall be called.” That is, those who are the children of the flesh, these are not the children of God; but the children of the promise are counted as the seed. For this is the word of promise: “At this time I will come and Sarah shall have a son.” And not only this, but when Rebecca also had conceived by one man, even by our father Isaac (for the children not yet being born, nor having done any good or evil, that the purpose of God according to election might stand, not of works but of Him who calls), it was said to her, “The older shall serve the younger.” As it is written, “Jacob I have loved, but Esau I have hated.” (Romans 9:6-13)
 

Constantlyreforming

Puritan Board Sophomore
Good thoughts John. The question was somewhat tongue-in-cheek, but was meant to get a conversation going regarding covenant theology...the idea that God has blessed Abraham with an everlasting covenant, of which we are part.
 

Miss Marple

Puritan Board Junior
I knew a person who mentioned that they were raised a strict Baptist, but taught to sing "Jesus Loves Me," which, in hindsight, he found inconsistent.

But I suppose we might all me inconsistent here and there. I am glad they were taught to sing that song.
 

Herald

Administrator
Staff member
Good thoughts John. The question was somewhat tongue-in-cheek, but was meant to get a conversation going regarding covenant theology...the idea that God has blessed Abraham with an everlasting covenant, of which we are part.
Ethan, I suggest starting a thread in the covenant theology forum.
 

Jack K

Puritan Board Professor
To answer your tongue-in-cheek question seriously... And admitting I'm paedo- (but I think I have a prespective that adds something here)...

In the Baptist church I'm a part of, I've heard people sing that song with kids and no one has raised any concerns as far as I know. They have kids sing all sorts of songs, all the time, that presume the kids are saved, among the elect, and part of the church family. I mean, what are you going to do? Have your kids sing "Jesus might love me" until they get baptized, and then change it? No, you sing stuff that presumes they will come to faith (just like Presbyterians do).

I do know a few more extreme Baptists who treat their kids like complete heathens until those kids say a sinner's prayer or something. And I know many who, if you ask them to explain their kids' status, end up saying something that sounds like they think their kids are complete heathens until that time. But when it comes to child-rearing practice, most Baptists I know have some recognition that the children of believers ought to be raised with a sense that they're part of the church family and special to God. Remember, most Baptists dedicate their babies. The idea of a covenant child, though not nearly as robust as it is for a Presbyterian, is not completely absent in most Baptist practice—even though the words and theology certainly are different.
 
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