RC Sproul: Truths We Confess - A Systematic Exposition of the Westminster Confession of Faith

RobertPGH1981

Puritan Board Sophomore
Hello All,

I just wanted to send a note out recommending RC Sproul's latest book "The Truths We Confess". I was lucky enough to pick up a copy on sale at the Regional Ligonier conference in Pittsburgh a few weeks ago. I have read through several chapters already and find the book helpful. Like all of RC's material, it is thoughtful, clear, and easy to understand. This book would make a great addition to anybody's library.

Any body else have a copy yet? What do you think?

Rob
 

Clemson_Gentleman

Puritan Board Freshman
Highly recommend, especially for someone relatively new to the Confession, or even someone just looking for a refresher course. Sproul threads the needle between an academic and pastoral presentation of the reformed faith, and this is no exception.
 

NaphtaliPress

Administrator
Staff member
Balance what Sproul has to say on the fourth and second commandments with those who don't take exception to those truths we supposedly confess.
From a 2008 review (note, it has been reported to me, but have not confirmed, that the images are at least no longer in the actual sanctuary):

With regard to the sect ion that begins “The acceptable way of worshipping the true God is instituted by Himself, and so limited by His own revealed will...,” the author claims that the prohibition of “visible representation” of the deity refers to “visible representations of God the Father” (312). On this, Dr. Sproul is simply, and grossly, mistaken: no Puritan theologian would have countenanced “pictures” of Christ; and furthermore, the Larger Catechism is perspicuous on the matter: “The sins forbidden in the second commandment are … the making any representation of God, of all or of any of the three persons, either inwardly in our mind, or outwardly in any kind of image or likeness of any creature whatsoever” (Answer 109). It is perhaps worth mentioning that the independent congregation which he past ors is fi lled with icons.12​
12. In researching this article, we received a brochure printed by the congregation which details the six, shall we say, revealing paintings of Christ which adorn the sanctuary.​
...​
He acknowledges the debate between those who regard the institution of the Sabbath as a creation ordinance and those who believe it was initiated under the Mosaic economy, while siding with the former position. However, he does not adopt the Puritan understanding of “pleasure” in Isaiah 58: 13–14—that it refers to recreation; in his view, the term refers to a refraining from unlawful commercial activity. He also, on logical grounds, takes exception to the confessional requirement of the whole Sabbath day being taken up “in the public and private exercises of His worship, and in the duties of necessity and mercy.” [this also displays a misunderstanding of the puritan view of the confession, cmc]​
While Dr. Sproul, in dealing with Chapter 21 of the Westminster Confession, mentions the regulative principle (and even appeals to the account of Nadab and Abihu), it is not evident that he really understands it. This is perhaps most obvious in his book A Taste of Heaven, that compares the apocalyptic vision of heaven to our earth-bound worship today. [and a review of A Taste of Heaven goes on, for which see the review of volume 2 of Truths We Confess, in The Confessional Presbyterian 4 (2008), pp. 241-242.​
 

greenbaggins

Administrator
Staff member
Sproul's commentary on the WCF is outstanding, though Chris's caveats are certainly worth noting. I would say that if one desires to have a good library on the WCF, one should have Shaw, Hodge, Pipa, Van Dixhoorn, Sproul, Dickson, and Beattie.
 

Taylor

Puritan Board Graduate
...and Beattie.
I've read a good bit of Beattie in preparation for licensure. To be honest, I found his commentary The Presbyterian Standards to be interesting. I found it to be more of a technical commentary on the text as text, and not necessarily a practical work like Sproul or Van Dixhoorn. That's not to say it wasn't good, but it wasn't what I expected it to be.
 

bookslover

Puritan Board Doctor
Sproul's commentary on the WCF is outstanding, though Chris's caveats are certainly worth noting. I would say that if one desires to have a good library on the WCF, one should have Shaw, Hodge, Pipa, Van Dixhoorn, Sproul, Dickson, and Beattie.

and Ashbel Green. His commentary on the Shorter Catechism (1841, I think) should definitely be reprinted. He wrote for students, but it would be edifying for all (besides, students in his day tended to know more than some students today).
 

aaronsk

Puritan Board Freshman
Hello All,

I just wanted to send a note out recommending RC Sproul's latest book "The Truths We Confess". I was lucky enough to pick up a copy on sale at the Regional Ligonier conference in Pittsburgh a few weeks ago. I have read through several chapters already and find the book helpful. Like all of RC's material, it is thoughtful, clear, and easy to understand. This book would make a great addition to anybody's library.

Any body else have a copy yet? What do you think?

Rob
I purchased it a while back on their website and it came with the ebook. It’s a great book and I reference it often especially the digital version on my pc. Did they give you a code or anything when purchasing at the conference to add it to your digital learning library?
 

Stephen L Smith

Administrator
Staff member
Sproul's commentary on the WCF is outstanding, though Chris's caveats are certainly worth noting. I would say that if one desires to have a good library on the WCF, one should have Shaw, Hodge, Pipa, Van Dixhoorn, Sproul, Dickson, and Beattie.
I thought a good OPC man like yourself would have included the one by G.I. Williamson :) [ He was also a much loved minister in the Reformed Churches of New Zealand].
 
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