Reading the Word of God

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leierbag

Puritan Board Freshman
Listening to a sermon by Eric Alexander on Isaiah [or was it Romans?] last month something struck me - he urged the congregation to read scripture aloud. I have been doing this with my wife for a long time now but it suddenly dawned on me how true that is. God's word somehow becomes even more 'alive' than it already is, and one of the benefits is I find is that Christ becomes more visible...
Isaiah 45:8 "Drop down, ye heavens, from above, and let the skies pour down righteousness: let the earth open, and let them bring forth salvation, and let righteousness spring up together; I the LORD have created it."
In Christ
Gabriel
 

Taylor

Puritan Board Senior
I have often thought about this. I once tried to do an entire Bible reading plan where I read the words aloud. It didn't last long, unfortunately. It takes some deal of work, and it is also hard then to read the Bible sitting on a plane, in a café, etc. But you're right, I think. At least to me, Scripture does seem to "come alive" more when it is read aloud.
 

leierbag

Puritan Board Freshman
I have often thought about this. I once tried to do an entire Bible reading plan where I read the words aloud. It didn't last long, unfortunately. It takes some deal of work, and it is also hard then to read the Bible sitting on a plane, in a café, etc. But you're right, I think. At least to me, Scripture does seem to "come alive" more when it is read aloud.
@Taylor , I agree, in public is one thing, but at home or amongst brothers/sisters in the faith it really is a blessing - also listening to scripture being read - whether from a pulpit or through headphones is absolute bliss - 'the 'unregurgitated' truth one person called it :)
 

RPEphesian

Puritan Board Junior
Long ago you did not read silently. In a library you whispered to yourself. Augustine caused some curiosity based on his practice of silent reading.
 

Ed Walsh

Puritan Board Senior
Listening to a sermon by Eric Alexander on Isaiah [or was it Romans?] last month something struck me - he urged the congregation to read scripture aloud.

Revelation 1:3 (ESV)
Blessed is the one who reads aloud (ἀναγινώσκω) the words of this prophecy, and blessed are those who hear, and who keep what is written in it, for the time is near.
 

leierbag

Puritan Board Freshman
wow, there is nothing we can say, add or subtract - absolutely fascinating how God covers ALL bases
 

py3ak

Unshaven and anonymous
Staff member
Possibly. I may have it backwards. Someone in church history was an oddball for this.
And Ambrose himself, as the world counts happy, I esteemed a happy man, whom personages so great held in such honour; only his celibacy seemed to me a painful course. But what hope he bore within him, what struggles he had against the temptations which beset his very excellencies, or what comfort in adversities, and what sweet joys Thy Bread had for the hidden mouth of his spirit, when chewing the cud thereof, I neither could conjecture, nor had experienced. Nor did he know the tides of my feelings, or the abyss of my danger. For I could not ask of him, what I would as I would, being shut out both from his ear and speech by multitudes of busy people, whose weaknesses he served. With whom when he was not taken up (which was but a little time), he was either refreshing his body with the sustenance absolutely necessary, or his mind with reading. But when he was reading, his eye glided over the pages, and his heart searched out the sense, but his voice and tongue were at rest. Ofttimes when we had come (for no man was forbidden to enter, nor was it his wont that any who came should be announced to him), we saw him thus reading to himself, and never otherwise; and having long sat silent (for who durst intrude on one so intent?) we were fain to depart, conjecturing that in the small interval which he obtained, free from the din of others’ business, for the recruiting of his mind, he was loth to be taken off; and perchance he dreaded lest if the author he read should deliver any thing obscurely, some attentive or perplexed hearer should desire him to expound it, or to discuss some of the harder questions; so that his time being thus spent, he could not turn over so many volumes as he desired; although the preserving of his voice (which a very little speaking would weaken) might be the truer reason for his reading to himself. But with what intent soever he did it, certainly in such a man it was good.

The Confessions of St. Augustine, 6.3, E.B. Pusey, trans (emphasis added)
 

RPEphesian

Puritan Board Junior
An oddball in Church history? You’ve really narrowed it down for us, brother. ;)

Well if you exclude all of those in church history who intentionally shaved themselves bald, or don't think twice about buying Ezekiel bread... does that help?
 
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