Reformation Heritage Books - Reprinting Schedule

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Pilgrim72

Puritan Board Junior
This might have been asked before, but I can't find it. And since this is a topic that is frequently on my mind:

Does RHB have a site where they state their schedule for upcoming reprints? I'm talking about years down the line too. Not just next month...

For example, does RHB plan to reprint these Soli Deo Gloria books?

The Mortified Christian, by Christopher Love
The Zealous Christian, by Christopher Love
Farewell Sermons
Sermons Of Thomas Watson
The Saint's Treasury, by Jeremiah Burroughs

These are just a few that are on the top of my list. But, I would certainly like a website, that I could go to, to give me something to look forward to.

Thanks!
 

VirginiaHuguenot

Puritanboard Librarian
I asked Dewalt about Farewell Sermons earlier this year and he said "there are no plans in reprinting this book for years." He is probably the person to ask about the others as well, or whether there is a publicly available timeframe for republishing these and other SDG books.
 

Pilgrim72

Puritan Board Junior
Thanks Andrew,

I just sent him a private message.

As far as Farewell Sermons goes, I believe that if they're going to reprint this one, they might as well get all the original farewell sermons that were in that book. Wasn't the SDG printing missing like 7 from the original? Plus, if they're going to do that, why not spend a little more time collecting more of the farewell sermons from 1662? I'm sure they can find enough to fill at least another volume. :)

And for those of us who love this stuff, why not release a sister volume(s) of Funeral Sermons? I would love to be on a project like that.
For example, I've been looking for the funeral sermon of Abraham Janeway, by Thomas Vincent. I read somewhere that an early printing had this sermon appended to "God's Terrible Voice In The City." Sadly, my copy doesn't have that in it.

*sigh* I think I'm rambling off topic.

Anyway, thanks for reading. :D
 

VirginiaHuguenot

Puritanboard Librarian
Alex -- You might find this thread to be of interest. I too would love to see Puritan funeral sermons republished:

http://www.puritanboard.com/f29/puritan-funeral-sermons-14682/

That funeral sermon for Abraham Janeway was, I think, appended to the 1667 edition of Thomas Vincent's God's Terrible Voice in the City, but not included, I believe, in the 19th century editions. The SDG edition is based on an 1831 edition rather than the 1667 first edition.

God's Terrible Voice in the City ... - Google Book Search
 

Don Kistler

Puritan Board Sophomore
Men, there is always a tension for a publisher of good Reformed literature between what we would like to publish and what we think we can sell.
The kinds of books you are discussing would have an extremely limited market.
Having to be good stewards of the Lord's resources makes these choices difficult. It took years and years to sell 1,000 copies of "Farewell Sermons." A book of funeral sermons would be an extremely tough sell.

Between the SDG lithograph of "Farewell Sermons" and the Banner of Truth paperback "Sermons of the Great Ejection," you have almost all the sermons of the original 17th century edition, I believe.
 

Pilgrim72

Puritan Board Junior
As a reader, I can only voice my desires. And I would, one day, love to take part in getting more Puritan works published, if the Lord wills.

I appreciate all the work that has been done to get these books out so far. It is certainly a work of God. And I praise Him daily as I read these books. I just wish more Christians loved to read... then we'd get more of these books sold. :book2:
 

Don Kistler

Puritan Board Sophomore
Also, with regard to "The Sermons of Thomas Watson," much of that was retypeset and included in "The Puritan Pulpit: Thomas Watson."
 

VirginiaHuguenot

Puritanboard Librarian

Don Kistler

Puritan Board Sophomore
I've just sent "Christian on the Mount" to the proofreader's. Look for it in early 2009 from Northampton Press.
 

Pilgrim72

Puritan Board Junior
Dr. Kistler! What incredible news!!!
I can't thank you enough for that. You don't know how happy you've made me!

This service you do for the Lord is certainly a huge blessing to His church.
 

Pilgrim72

Puritan Board Junior
One more thing... which might be off the topic of the OP. But have you noticed that some Puritans can sometimes be a little over-dramatic to prove a point? I've sorta noticed this with Watson, although I think he may be one of my favorites.

Like, what does he mean when he says in A Christian On The Mount, "The meditation of God's holiness would have this effect; it would be a means to transform us into the similitude and likeness of God. God never loves us till we are like Him."
If he's just saying that God doesn't love us until He saves us, thus making us more like Christ, I can see that. But if he's saying that God doesn't love us unless we spend more time in meditation on God's holiness (which makes us more like Him), then I would see a problem with that. But even if he meant it in that way, I would just think that he phrased it that way to urge Christians to meditate...

And also, in The Art Of Divine Contentment, he states, "The doctrine of contentment is very superlative, and until we have learned this we have not learned to be Christians."
It seems, once again, that to stress his topic he goes a little overboard and says something that may not be true. Not all Christians have learned contentment, and we are always learning. Does that mean that these Christians don't know what it is to be Christians?

I've seen this in a lot of Puritan works and have learned that it may just be a way for them to state the importance of their topic at hand. And may not really be as dogmatic as it sounds.

Anyway, your thoughts would be appreciated. :graduate:

Thanks!!!
 

VirginiaHuguenot

Puritanboard Librarian
Dr. Kistler! What incredible news!!!
I can't thank you enough for that. You don't know how happy you've made me!

This service you do for the Lord is certainly a huge blessing to His church.

:ditto: :pilgrim:

Dr. Kistler -- Is there a forthcoming titles list for Northampton Press?
 

Don Kistler

Puritan Board Sophomore
Here's a tentative list, all subject to funding, which is very low these days.

A View of Saving Faith from the Sacred Records, by John Colquhoun

A Christian on the Mount, by Thomas Watson

The Safety of Appearing on the Day of Judgment in the Righteousness of Christ, by Solomon Stoddard

Light and Heat, the Puritan View of the Pulpit, by Bruce Bickel

The Covenant of Grace, by John Colquhoun

The Covenant of Works, by John Colquhoun

Sight and Faith, by Joseph Symonds

plus, a collections of previously unpublished Edwards sermons on the Person and work of Christ.


So, send money!:)
 

VirginiaHuguenot

Puritanboard Librarian
That's a very good list, thanks so much!

I just recently ordered a copy of Light and Heat by Bruce Bickel because that's been on my wish list for some time.

I look forward to each and every one of these. :pilgrim:
 

Pilgrim72

Puritan Board Junior
So... I'm guessing there are no thoughts on this?

One more thing... which might be off the topic of the OP. But have you noticed that some Puritans can sometimes be a little over-dramatic to prove a point? I've sorta noticed this with Watson, although I think he may be one of my favorites.

Like, what does he mean when he says in A Christian On The Mount, "The meditation of God's holiness would have this effect; it would be a means to transform us into the similitude and likeness of God. God never loves us till we are like Him."
If he's just saying that God doesn't love us until He saves us, thus making us more like Christ, I can see that. But if he's saying that God doesn't love us unless we spend more time in meditation on God's holiness (which makes us more like Him), then I would see a problem with that. But even if he meant it in that way, I would just think that he phrased it that way to urge Christians to meditate...

And also, in The Art Of Divine Contentment, he states, "The doctrine of contentment is very superlative, and until we have learned this we have not learned to be Christians."
It seems, once again, that to stress his topic he goes a little overboard and says something that may not be true. Not all Christians have learned contentment, and we are always learning. Does that mean that these Christians don't know what it is to be Christians?

I've seen this in a lot of Puritan works and have learned that it may just be a way for them to state the importance of their topic at hand. And may not really be as dogmatic as it sounds.

Anyway, your thoughts would be appreciated. :graduate:

Thanks!!!
 
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