Roman Poets in Rutherford sermon?

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NaphtaliPress

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And here is another and last (see here and here) I think from the Samuel Rutherford Sermon I'm currently editing:
Use One. I desire to make some use of this. And one, there are no worldly states and monarchies of whom this can be said. Their Kingdom such as cannot be destroyed. Where is there a worldly kingdom that cannot be shaken? Moab was a kingdom, and yet Moab shall die in his own vomit (Jer. 48:26). Egypt is a great kingdom, and yet it is broken like an old clay pot or a lame vessel. The four great monarchies are become like four mayflowers withered, and their rosy blossoms are fallen off them in their month. Did they mean no truth who said of earthly kingdoms, omnis faelicitas ad culmen perducta, retrogreditur; and, magna suo pondere ruunt. Worldly felicity when it is at the height of the stars, sits down and slips back again. And great things of this earth are a burden to themselves. Summisque negatum stare diu. It is denied to great things to stand long.
There appear to be three Latin references which squares with R's use of "they." The last, Summisque negatum stare diu, It is denied to great things to stand long, is from Lucan's Pharsalia, which was easy to find even not having Latin in school as a search of the Latin phrase hits right on the money and it is fairly well known. The other two get no exact hits on Google or Google books. The second might be Lucan also but none of the words appear together; the first I get no leads at all. It is possible these are all Roman poets given the Lucan reference, but I"m not sure? Needless (?) to say I don't get any hits on Rutherford's translations.
 
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