Samuel Willard's Big Book

Taylor

Puritan Board Graduate
He believes that the Lord's Day begins in the evening, that is, on Saturday night at sundown.
Is "at sundown" for Willard the equivalent of "bedtime," or does the Lord's Day begin when the sun goes down regardless of whether or not people are asleep? Also, does the Lord's Day therefore end on Sunday at sundown? I had always figured this view was held by some, but I've never encountered it, so this is interesting.

Thanks for the regular updates. I commend you for sticking with it.
 

bookslover

Puritan Board Doctor
Is "at sundown" for Willard the equivalent of "bedtime," or does the Lord's Day begin when the sun goes down regardless of whether or not people are asleep? Also, does the Lord's Day therefore end on Sunday at sundown? I had always figured this view was held by some, but I've never encountered it, so this is interesting.

Thanks for the regular updates. I commend you for sticking with it.

The impression I have is that he means "when the sun goes down." So, I assume he also means that the Lord's Day ends on Sunday night. I could be wrong but, as I said, these were just the first two sermons on the Commandment.
 

bookslover

Puritan Board Doctor
Here's Willard on frequency of Communion:

. . .the Lord's Supper is not under a precept of being administered every Lord's Day but may be dispensed either oftener or seldomer, as the circumstances of the people concerned therein may be. Nor is there any prescription in the gospel for it, only it should be frequent. . .
 

bookslover

Puritan Board Doctor
Still chugging along. In a few days, I'll have the first 200 sermons under my belt. As I may have mentioned, he is very organized and very detailed.
 

bookslover

Puritan Board Doctor
Well, I've finished the first 200 sermons. He's in the midst of expositing the Ten Commandments and has reached "You shall not steal."

As I've noted, there are 246 numbered sermons. He continued to preach to his congregation on the Shorter Catechism once a month until April 1, 1707, when illness forced him to stop after preaching on Question 87, which was sermon 220. However, he continued to write out full sermons on the questions for his congregation to read until he reached Question 100 (the preface to the Lord's Prayer), which was sermon 246. For the remaining 7 questions of the Catechism, the editors, Joseph Sewall and Thomas Prince (who saw this book through the press in 1726), relied on a shorter explication of the Catechism which Willard had preached many years before. Willard died in September, 1707, aged 67.

This must be one of the longest and most detailed expositions of the Shorter Catechism ever published - 983 pages, and 2 columns per page.
 

bookslover

Puritan Board Doctor
I ran across a word I'd never seen before. In a sermon preached in 1705, Willard uses the term "plogganism" which, apparently, is a synonym for "man-stealing" (kidnapping). It's the first really odd word I've run across in my reading.
 
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