Should we love God more than our neighbour?

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InSlaveryToChrist

Puritan Board Junior
I heard one Christian say that "we should love our neighbour as ourselves (less than we love God)." That strikes me. I've never really thought about it, but shouldn't our love be unconditional toward our neighbour and God alike?

"Every man according as he purposeth in his heart, so let him give; not grudgingly, or of necessity: for God loveth a cheerful giver." (2 Corinthians 9:7)

Does this not apply to our love for God? I know God is lovable, who wouldn't want to love Him after seeing how He loved us! But is that what God is calling us to do? Love Him based on His love for us? A further question: Can love be free, that is, not "of necessity", and yet be based on the virtue of someone? Isn't that a contradiction?
 

Joseph Scibbe

Puritan Board Junior
I think our love for God ought to be the strongest, greatest, most intense love we have. Our love for God spawns our love for our neighbors.
 

nicnap

Puritan Board Post-Graduate
Now great crowds accompanied him, and he turned and said to them, "If anyone comes to me and does not hate his own father and mother and wife and children and brothers and sisters, yes, and even his own life, he cannot be my disciple." I think it is pretty clear whom we are to love more. Our love for God is to be so great, that all other love looks like hate, comparatively.
 

InSlaveryToChrist

Puritan Board Junior
Now great crowds accompanied him, and he turned and said to them, "If anyone comes to me and does not hate his own father and mother and wife and children and brothers and sisters, yes, and even his own life, he cannot be my disciple." I think it is pretty clear whom we are to love more. Our love for God is to be so great, that all other love looks like hate, comparatively.

I think you're misinterpreting that passage. You are confusing a type of love that approves of virtue with a type of love that seeks the good of others. It is the former in this passage. Jesus is saying that if we don't hate/disapprove of the virtue of our neighbours and ourselves, we cannot be His disciples. He is not saying we shouldn't love them in a sense of seeking their good/happiness. Of course we should love them (and ourselves)! And that's why we must hate them in a sense of disapproval. Look at the Greek words and you will see what I'm talking about -- the Bible involves many kinds of love and consequently many kinds of hatred.
 

nicnap

Puritan Board Post-Graduate
I think you're taking that passage out of context.

Am I?

You are confusing a type of love that approves of virtue with a type of love that seeks the good of others. It is the former in this passage.

Am I?

He is not saying we shouldn't love them in a sense of seeking their good/happiness. Of course we should love them! And that's why we must hate them in a sense of disapproval.

I think you need to reread my comment, number 1. Number 2, I think there can be too much a distinction placed on the words for love in Scripture. Perhaps, you should do a little more of a study on the words for love.
 

InSlaveryToChrist

Puritan Board Junior
I think you're taking that passage out of context.

Am I?

I didn't mean to say that. Note I fixed it.

You are confusing a type of love that approves of virtue with a type of love that seeks the good of others. It is the former in this passage.

Am I?

I think you're.

He is not saying we shouldn't love them in a sense of seeking their good/happiness. Of course we should love them! And that's why we must hate them in a sense of disapproval.

I think you need to reread my comment, number 1. Number 2, I think there can be too much a distinction placed on the words for love in Scripture. Perhaps, you should do a little more of a study on the words for love.

So, you really think the passage is not to be taken literally? I think we should.
 
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