Sum Of Saving Knowledge: "not to be justly stumbled"

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ExGentibus

Puritan Board Freshman
I am currently translating the Sum Of Saving Knowledge, and found one line a bit confusing in Head III.1:

THE outward means and ordinances, for making men partakers of the covenant of grace, are so wisely dispensed, as that the elect shall be infallibly converted and saved by them; and the reprobate, among whom they are, not to be justly stumbled

Now, does "not to be justly stumbled" mean that the reprobates will have no just reason to complain?

Any help would be much appreciated.
 

MW

Puritanboard Amanuensis
Now, does "not to be justly stumbled" mean that the reprobates will have no just reason to complain?

The stumbling of the reprobate is placed in opposition to the converting of the elect, so it is their response to the outward means of grace. "Stumbled" is being used in the sense of 1 Peter 2:8 -- "which stumble at the word." Yet the stumbling cannot be justly regarded as the fault of the outward means of grace. They stumble at the means, but they cannot blame the means for their stumbling, as the fault lies in themselves.
 

ExGentibus

Puritan Board Freshman
Yet the stumbling cannot be justly regarded as the fault of the outward means of grace. They stumble at the means, but they cannot blame the means for their stumbling, as the fault lies in themselves.
Thanks Rev. Winzer, now that "justly" makes perfect sense to me.
 
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