The Apostolic Calendar for 1842: Presbyterian Holy Days

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NaphtaliPress

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In case you thought this idea might be original to you (some of us have done similar at least conceptually if not graphically), @Wayne Sparkman found this in a rare tract now in the hands of the PCA Historical Center. Hopefully he can scan the full tract to make it available. From the 1842 publication "An Essay on Feast Days and Fast Days in the Christian Church" by Presbyterian minister Cortlandt Van Rensselaer.
PresbyterianHolyDaysFor1842.jpg
 

NaphtaliPress

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From the BRPR v14 for 1842, about the tract: "This is an effectual exposure of the unauthorized character and evil tendency of the multitude of feasts and fasts with which the calendar of many churches has been filled. The multiplication of days regarded as sacred by human appointment, is clearly shown to tend to the disregard of that one day which God has commanded his people to keep holy." https://books.google.com/books?id=fWZAAQAAMAAJ&pg=PA356#v=onepage&q&f=false
 

Jack K

Puritan Board Professor
An intriguing find. Presbyterian passive aggressiveness, from 1842. And all this time I thought it was a 21st Century thing.
 

bookish_Basset

Puritan Board Freshman
I would be very interested in reading the full tract. From the Google Books link above, it was written in response to Bishop Doane, who seems to have been a High Church Episcopal bishop. Judging from the date, I'm guessing the latter was likely influenced by the Oxford Movement. I wonder how much influence the Oxford Movement had on various parts of American Protestantism, in terms of increased observance of "holy days"?
 

TheOldCourse

Puritan Board Sophomore
I would be very interested in reading the full tract. From the Google Books link above, it was written in response to Bishop Doane, who seems to have been a High Church Episcopal bishop. Judging from the date, I'm guessing the latter was likely influenced by the Oxford Movement. I wonder how much influence the Oxford Movement had on various parts of American Protestantism, in terms of increased observance of "holy days"?

In the Presbyterian church, a lot. In the 19th century there was a liturgical movement in the mainline Presbyterian churches that turned its back on regulated worship and instead sought to adopt the liturgical calendar and other high church practices primarily from Anglicanism. I'm not sure how the liturgical calendar won over fundamentalism, however. Until recently many of the days seemed too "Catholic" for them, but they seem to have been comfortable with Christmas and Easter for as long as I'm aware.
 

NaphtaliPress

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There were just as obnoxious "we have holy days, we are a church, and you are not" anglocatholic style Episcopalians (think Richard Hooker, if not Laud) in the federal period.

See a series of articles I wrote for the first several issue of The Confessional Presbyterian noted below.* Message "Wayne" (Wayne Sparkman) if you want a copy. He has already made the offer of a full scan on Facebook. I've already received a copy.
*One of the snarkiest Episcopalians was the bishop of NY, Hobart. It is quite telling, the response of an evangelical episcopalian when Hobart died, who responded to the eulogy that was lamenting "we shall not see such again," with a "yes, please Lord."
"Antiquary: T. & J. Swords. Part One. Printers During the Federal Period to Doctors, Scientists, Friendly and Calliopean Clubers, and other New York Literati, as well as High Churchists, and the Occasional Presbyterian. The Confessional Presbyterian vol. 2 (2006).
"Antiquary: T. & J. Swords. Part Two. Two Large Presbyterian Works." vol. 3 (2007).
And specifically, "Antiquary: T. & J. Swords. Part Three: The ‘High Churchism’ Controversy." vol. 4 (2008).

I would be very interested in reading the full tract. From the Google Books link above, it was written in response to Bishop Doane, who seems to have been a High Church Episcopal bishop. Judging from the date, I'm guessing the latter was likely influenced by the Oxford Movement. I wonder how much influence the Oxford Movement had on various parts of American Protestantism, in terms of increased observance of "holy days"?
In the Presbyterian church, a lot. In the 19th century there was a liturgical movement in the mainline Presbyterian churches that turned its back on regulated worship and instead sought to adopt the liturgical calendar and other high church practices primarily from Anglicanism. I'm not sure how the liturgical calendar won over fundamentalism, however. Until recently many of the days seemed too "Catholic" for them, but they seem to have been comfortable with Christmas and Easter for as long as I'm aware.
 

NaphtaliPress

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Wayne says folks can ask and get a copy of the full track from me. Message me with an email I can send it too if you want it.
I would be very interested in reading the full tract. From the Google Books link above, it was written in response to Bishop Doane, who seems to have been a High Church Episcopal bishop. Judging from the date, I'm guessing the latter was likely influenced by the Oxford Movement. I wonder how much influence the Oxford Movement had on various parts of American Protestantism, in terms of increased observance of "holy days"?
 

ADKing

Puritan Board Junior
I would love a copy too. I can't help but find it somewhat ironic, however, that the year the tract was published was a year December 25 was on a Sabbath. Too bad it wasn't 1841 or 1843.
 
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