The Atonement in the Heidelberg Catechism

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James Swan

Puritan Board Freshman
I've been memorizing the Heidelberg Catechism, questions and answers. I've made it to Lord's Day 17.

Here's how the translation I'm using presents Question and Answer #37

Q. What do you understand by the word, "suffered"?

A. That during his whole life on earth, but especially at the end, Christ sustained, in body and soul, the anger of God against the sin of the whole human race.

I was curious if anyone could recommend any sources on Zacharius Ursinus or Caspar Olevianus on the extent of the atonement. Yes, I am aware already that the extent of the atonement was a question that came under scrutiny and sharper focus later in Reformed history.
 

Phil D.

Puritan Board Junior
In his commentary on this question in the catechism Ursinus recites the language of scripture, "Behold the Lamb of God that taketh away the sins of the world." (John 1: 29) H then goes on to state:

Objection 4: If Christ made satisfaction for all, then all ought to be saved. But all are not saved. Therefore, he did not make a perfect satisfaction. Answer: Christ satisfied for all, as it respects the sufficiency of the satisfaction which he made, but not as it respects the application thereof; for he fulfilled the law in a two-fold respect. First, by his own righteousness; and secondly, by making satisfaction for our sins, each of which is most perfect. But the satisfaction is made ours by an application, which is also two-fold; the former of which is made by God, when he justifies us on account of the merit of his Son, and brings it to pass that we cease from sin; the latter is accomplished by us through faith. For we apply unto ourselves, the merit of Christ, when by a true faith, we are fully persuaded that God for the sake of the satisfaction of his Son, remits unto us our sins. Without this application, the satisfaction of Christ is of no benefit to us.​
 

moral necessity

Puritan Board Junior
In his commentary on this question in the catechism Ursinus recites the language of scripture, "Behold the Lamb of God that taketh away the sins of the world." (John 1: 29) H then goes on to state:

Objection 4: If Christ made satisfaction for all, then all ought to be saved. But all are not saved. Therefore, he did not make a perfect satisfaction. Answer: Christ satisfied for all, as it respects the sufficiency of the satisfaction which he made, but not as it respects the application thereof; for he fulfilled the law in a two-fold respect. First, by his own righteousness; and secondly, by making satisfaction for our sins, each of which is most perfect. But the satisfaction is made ours by an application, which is also two-fold; the former of which is made by God, when he justifies us on account of the merit of his Son, and brings it to pass that we cease from sin; the latter is accomplished by us through faith. For we apply unto ourselves, the merit of Christ, when by a true faith, we are fully persuaded that God for the sake of the satisfaction of his Son, remits unto us our sins. Without this application, the satisfaction of Christ is of no benefit to us.​

Thanks for this...sounds like Calvin in the beginning of Book 3 of the Institutes...
 
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