The Christian’s Reasonable Service / Vol. 3 - Quotes

G

Puritan Board Senior
On page 10 of Volume III., Brakel outlines the way our Old Nature still seeks to wage war with the Regenerated Man; specifically regarding how the Old Nature will seek to keep us from doing good. Oh how many times I’ve sinfully used the below reasoning of my flesh to put off that which is good.:(

Secondly, the old nature is likewise always engaged in keeping man from that which is good.
(1) There will be no time for one to engage in his godly exercises of praying, reading, singing, and meditation. Therefore these exercises either do not occur at all, or only in a casual manner to satisfy the conscience. It is as if he is rushed, even though he frequently would have the time.
(2) At another time one will postpone the matter, determining to do it, but to do it in a more quiet and composed manner; certain things first have to be accomplished. In the meanwhile time slips away or the Spirit has departed, and one does not get to it, or it is void of all spirituality.
(3) Then again the task appears as being exceptionally difficult; one looks up against it, and seeks to avoid and postpone it. Having burdened himself with many difficulties, he approaches the duty as a lazy person and, so to speak, crawls forward. It is too difficult and one is not fit to do it.
 

G

Puritan Board Senior
Pg. 20 and a reminder that we as Christ followers should be known by a pursuit of Holiness. And what is this Holiness?
However, since all that glitters is not gold, everything that has the appearance of holiness and is called holiness is not holiness; this we have demonstrated. There are three requisites for holiness: 1) it proceeds from a good root: faith; 2) it functions according to a good rule: the will of God as revealed in the law; and 3) it has a good objective: the honor of God.
 
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G

Puritan Board Senior
What a wonderful day! Here Brakel is setting up his own commentary on each of the 10 Commandments. Firstly, he helps his reader to ensure he/she has a proper understanding of the 10 Commandments both with regard to the Law of Nature and it’s purpose in the CoW and CoG.

From pg. 39:
It cannot be satisfactorily resolved why the law was not written upon paper or parchment, nor in silver or gold. We may, however, turn with this to the human heart, which is as hard as a stone so that no one but God Himself can inscribe His laws there (Ezek 36:26-27). We may thus also reflect upon the eternal duration of the law, which would not be abolished in the Old or New Testament. Neither can it be satisfactorily resolved why the law was not written with letters placed upon the stone rather than by engraven letters. One may, however, conjecture that it is not sufficient to observe and perform the law externally, but rather that it must be engraved in the heart (Jer 31:33). The fact that the tables were inscribed on both sides may also support the suggestion that the law is the rule for all actions, and must govern man wherever he may go or turn, both in body and in soul, with all his faculties, and can neither add to nor subtract from it. Moreover, if someone asks why the law was not written upon one, but upon two tables, we answer that the law pertains to two objects: God and one‘s neighbor, as the Lord Jesus shows in Matt 22:37, 39.

From pg. 43:
Question Is the law of the ten commandments a covenant of works?
Answer: No; we shall demonstrate this to be so for the following reasons:

First, God‘s righteousness cannot permit a sinner to enter into a covenant of friendship without a Surety who bears
the punishment of the broken covenant on behalf of the sinner. However, the Israelites were sinners, and the covenant of works is without a Surety. Thus, the law cannot be a covenant of works.
Secondly, the person with whom God would establish a covenant of works, ought to be able to satisfy the demands of the covenant of works, and to obtain life in consequence thereof, for God‘s holiness, righteousness, and truth will not permit the establishment of a true covenant upon the basis of a dishonest promise of man. These attributes also will not permit, as a condition for salvation, that man be required to perform that which he cannot perform. These attributes will not allow perfection to be again set before the impotent sinner as a condition for salvation, and thus establish a second covenant of works, even though God, by virtue of man‘s original condition when he was included in the covenant of works, may righteously demand perfect obedience from man who wilfully deprived himself of his own power. After the fall man is not able to perfectly satisfy the demands of a covenant of works, and therefore a new covenant of works cannot be established with man, and the law can consequently not be a covenant of works.

From pg. 45:
The Jews corrupted the true purpose for which both the moral and ceremonial laws had been given. They considered it to be a covenant of works and sought for their righteousness in this covenant—as many who are Christians only in name still do. These misconceptions are identified and rebuked in the texts mentioned above.
 

G

Puritan Board Senior
Dealing with an Objection proposing tolerance for the insisting the the Law of Christ and the Ten Commandments Differ/ Brakel gives the Answer, pg. 58-59:
Objection #1: There is agreement in this, since both insist upon sanctification. Regardless of whether one does so from different motives than another person, one must be tolerant of another.

Answer (1) This is the ancient language of all heretics. They reason as follows: It is already an old issue, and there is agreement as far as the matter itself is concerned, that is, holiness. We both insist on this, and therefore, be tolerant, be tolerant. This has an appearance of excellency, for those who propose moderation are the men of peace, but those who stand in the breach for the truth are deemed to be stubborn. By means of this wonderful illusion they seek to promote their errors all the more forcefully, and upon gaining the upper hand they can no longer tolerate sound doctrine. Instead, they will chase faithful ministers from the pulpit and out of town. This was the result of the toleration of the Arminians.
 
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