The Command to Sing - and my new blog

Status
Not open for further replies.

W.C. Dean

Puritan Board Freshman
Greetings everyone, I decided late last year to make a blog as means of advocating Exclusive Psalmody (and perhaps other topcis) in the Orthodox Presbyterian Church. Today I finished my second article, which is the first in a series where I want to take principles of Exclusive Psalmody, and give a concise introduction to their substance, as a wading pool for those new to the doctrine of EP. If you are seasoned in the doctrine you will probably find nothing new in the article, but perhaps you can use it as a means to explain to those less read on the subject. Please let me know if you have any criticism, so I can do a better job in the future. May the Lord bless you on this Sabbath day Christian.

https://oppuritan.home.blog/2020/01/12/the-command-to-sing/
 

Jeri Tanner

Moderator
Staff member
Good job, well-written and informative. Do you know any OPC pastors or members (outside the three churches who are EP) who hold to EP?
 

W.C. Dean

Puritan Board Freshman
Good job, well-written and informative. Do you know any OPC pastors or members (outside the three churches who are EP) who hold to EP?
I've never met anyone in person who also holds to Exclusive Psalmody. Some are more charitable to me than others when the topic is discussed. I know of other EP ministers in the denomination, but they're mostly quite elderly and retired. In fact, other than the pastors of Calvary (New Jersey) and First (California) OPC every EP OPC minister I've heard of is retired.
 

Tom Hart

Puritan Board Senior
I've never met anyone in person who also holds to Exclusive Psalmody. Some are more charitable to me than others when the topic is discussed.
I sympathize! I met psalm-singing believers only last summer. Among other Christians I don't bring up the topic much. If I do talk about psalmody, I explain the richness and benefits of it. Most of the time people can agree that far. It's just that word exclusive that people tend to squirm at.

I'll remember to pray for you.
 

Jeri Tanner

Moderator
Staff member
I remember when I had never met anyone in person who held to EP. I had scoured Facebook and the internet for any such persons in my state and came up with zero. So I assumed that was the way it was. Then, lo and behold, a FB message changed all that and I learned there were quite a few, right here in my city. They’re out there, just a quiet bunch who keep a low profile. :)
 

W.C. Dean

Puritan Board Freshman
I sympathize! I met psalm-singing believers only last summer. Among other Christians I don't bring up the topic much. If I do talk about psalmody, I explain the richness and benefits of it. Most of the time people can agree that far. It's just that word exclusive that people tend to squirm at.

I'll remember to pray for you.
Thank you for your prayer and encouragement. Any thoughts on my article?

I remember when I had never met anyone in person who held to EP. I had scoured Facebook and the internet for any such persons in my state and came up with zero. So I assumed that was the way it was. Then, lo and behold, a FB message changed all that and I learned there were quite a few, right here in my city. They’re out there, just a quiet bunch who keep a low profile. :)
Thank you for kind words. How did you find the group near you? The nearest EP church to me is an over two hour drive
 

Jeri Tanner

Moderator
Staff member
There was no group as of yet. A wonderful young man from the area who was close to finishing seminary, and who held to EP, desired to establish an RPCNA church plant here. He had learned that there were a couple of families here with RP backgrounds, and he learned about me through a mutual friend here on the PB. He contacted and gathered us all together.
 

Tom Hart

Puritan Board Senior
Any thoughts on my article?
I will gladly share this with friends whose ears might be open to it. The writing is good and concise. More articles of similar length would be quite shareable.

Just a couple of minor notes: First, Colossae is spelt wrong, and you use the contraction would've. It's better form, in formal writing, to use the full would have.
 

Stephen L Smith

Moderator
Staff member
you use the contraction would've. It's better form, in formal writing, to use the full would have.
I second this. One gripe I have about certain Bible translations is they use verbal contractions. I would have thought the Bible would qualify as formal writing. There should be nothing causal or flippant about the holy Scriptures.
 

W.C. Dean

Puritan Board Freshman
Thank you Tom and Stephen for your recommendations, I'm not surprised I spelled Colossae wrong, I will fix it now, along with the contraction.
 

jwright82

Puritan Board Graduate
Greetings everyone, I decided late last year to make a blog as means of advocating Exclusive Psalmody (and perhaps other topcis) in the Orthodox Presbyterian Church. Today I finished my second article, which is the first in a series where I want to take principles of Exclusive Psalmody, and give a concise introduction to their substance, as a wading pool for those new to the doctrine of EP. If you are seasoned in the doctrine you will probably find nothing new in the article, but perhaps you can use it as a means to explain to those less read on the subject. Please let me know if you have any criticism, so I can do a better job in the future. May the Lord bless you on this Sabbath day Christian.

https://oppuritan.home.blog/2020/01/12/the-command-to-sing/
D. G. Hart wrote "With Reverence and Awe" I believe he defends EP. It's a good book all around.
 

RPEphesian

Puritan Board Junior
@W.C. Dean

I see you reference Craig Scott's series on worship. It's been a great joy to sit under this series!

I strongly encourage serious listening to at least some of his first sermons on the nature of worship before ever touching Exclusive Psalmody itself. Many non-EP'ers have an impression that because our hymnbook contains the language of types and shadows that it can't be all that edifying for a New Covenant Christian, and I think that there is plenty out there already that immediately jumps to the Regulative Principle and arguments why only the Psalms should be sung. The very best argument against the common types-and-shadows argument would be that those who sing the Psalms truly do worship in their souls, singing and making spiritual melody in the heart, know themselves as being filled with the Spirit, and feel themselves through the singing of the Psalms to come into the presence of the Triune God. If that is not our experience, whatever else is said, a lack of true worship injures the argument.
 

Wretched Man

Puritan Board Freshman
I don’t have a stance on EP, but must admit I have grown to strongly appreciate singing from the Psalter (which is a new experience for me having recently started attending an OPC church). It’s nice knowing what you’re singing is actually God’s word and you don’t have to worry about whether it is doctrinally correct.

I suppose years of secular and warped “Christian” music have put me in the habit of simply ignoring lyrics and sapped the worship value out of singing during service.
 

KMK

Administrator
Staff member
I am not getting your subtle humor Ken
EPers are like Bigfoot to me in that I have heard of their existence, and have no reason doubt it, but no one I know has ever met one in person.

Come to think of it, the same goes for Historic Premils.
 

W.C. Dean

Puritan Board Freshman
https://oppuritan.home.blog/2020/01/19/the-command-to-sing-pt-2/

Article 2 in the series, subject is the direct commands to sing, and how singing is different in terms on content compared to prayers and preaching.

@RPEphesian I understand what you said here, and I agree. I will write about the Psalms' sufficiency and Christ-exalting lyrics. However the point of blog is to advocate EP within the OPC, which is already comfortable with the regular singing of the Psalms, just not exclusively.
 
Status
Not open for further replies.
Top