The danger of groundless impressions (John Newton on George Whitefield)

Status
Not open for further replies.

Reformed Covenanter

Cancelled Commissioner
“Good men have need to take heed of building upon groundless impressions. Mr. Whitfield had a son, whom he imagined born to be a very extraordinary man: but the son soon died, and the father was cured of his mistake.” John Newton

Richard Cecil (ed.), Memoirs of the Rev. John Newton, with General Remarks on His Life, Connections, and Character (1808) in The Works of the Rev. John Newton (6 vols, London: Hamilton, Adams, and Co., 1824), 1: 102.
 

Stephen L Smith

Moderator
Staff member
Jonathan Edwards also had similar concerns about George Whitefield. See Marsden's biography on Edwards pg 211 ff. See also Murray's biography on Edwards Appendix 4.
 

Regi Addictissimus

Completely sold out to the King
“Good men have need to take heed of building upon groundless impressions. Mr. Whitfield had a son, whom he imagined born to be a very extraordinary man: but the son soon died, and the father was cured of his mistake.” John Newton

Richard Cecil (ed.), Memoirs of the Rev. John Newton, with General Remarks on His Life, Connections, and Character (1808) in The Works of the Rev. John Newton (6 vols, London: Hamilton, Adams, and Co., 1824), 1: 102.
The story of baby John's death was quite tragic. It was, indeed, a hard lesson to be learned.
I am currently reading the two-volume biography on Whitefield by Dallimore. I have gained much respect for Whitefield in reading this biography. I do not commend all of his actions, but he was a rather pious man.
 

iainduguid

Puritan Board Sophomore
“Good men have need to take heed of building upon groundless impressions. Mr. Whitfield had a son, whom he imagined born to be a very extraordinary man: but the son soon died, and the father was cured of his mistake.” John Newton

Richard Cecil (ed.), Memoirs of the Rev. John Newton, with General Remarks on His Life, Connections, and Character (1808) in The Works of the Rev. John Newton (6 vols, London: Hamilton, Adams, and Co., 1824), 1: 102.
Most of us probably imagine our children to be born to be extraordinary (especially our firstborn). It is tragic that he had to be disabused in such a way. I will be happy if my children all turn out to be normal sinners, undeservedly saved by God's extraordinary electing grace.
PS I do have remarkable children, though!
 
Status
Not open for further replies.
Top